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Naval Medal of Honor Citations
American Civil War, 326 total

Asterisk (*) following last name indicates posthumous award. Engagement totals appear below chart.
Images of the Navy Medal of Honor (obverse) and (reverse)

Last Name

First Name

Date of Action (M/D/Y)

Rank

Born

Where Born

Accred*

G.O. No.**

Citation

Aheam

Michael

6

19

1864

Paymaster's Steward

--

--

--

45

(Enlisted in France.) Served on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Carrying out his duties courageously, PmS. Aheam exhibited marked coolness and good conduct and was highly recommended by his divisional officer for gallantry under enemy fire.

Anderson

Robert

--

--

1863

Quarter-master

1841

Ireland

NH

17

Served on board the USS Crusader and the Keokuk during various actions of those vessels. Carrying out his duties skillfully while on board the USS Crusader, Q.M. Anderson, on all occasions, set forth the greatest intrepidity and devotion. During the attack on Charleston, while serving on board the USS Keokuk, Q.M. Anderson was stationed at the wheel when shot penetrated the house and, with the scattering of the iron, used his own body as a shield for his commanding officer.

Angling

John

1

14

1865

Cabin Boy

1850

ME (Portland)

ME

59

Served on board the USS Pontoosic during the capture of Fort Fisher and Wilmington, 24 Dec 1864 to 22 Jan 1865. Carrying out his duties faithfully during this period, C.B. Angling was recommended for gallantry and skill and for his cool courage while under the fire of the enemy throughout these various actions.

Arther

Matthew

2

6

1862

Signal Quarter-master

1835

Scotland

 

--

17

(Entered service at Boston, MA.) Served on board the USS Carondelet at the reduction of Forts Henry and Donelson, 6 and 14 February 1862 and other actions. Carrying out his duties as signal quartermaster and captain of the rifled bow gun, S/Q.M. Arther was conspicuous for valor and devotion, serving most faithfully, effectively and valiantly.

Asten

Charles

5

5

1864

Quarter Gunner

1834

Nova Scotia (Halifax)

IL

45

Served on board the USS Signal, Red River, 5 May 1864. Proceeding up the Red River, the USS Signal engaged a large force of enemy field batteries and sharpshooters, returning their fire until the Federal ship was totally disabled, at which time the white flag was raised. Although on the sick list, Q.G. Asten courageously carried out his duties during the entire engagement.

Atkinson

Thomas E.

8

5

1864

Yeoman

1824

MA (Salem)

MA

45

On board the USS Richmond, Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864; commended for coolness and energy in supplying the rifle ammunition, which was under his sole charge, in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning of 5 August 1864. He was a petty officer on board the U.S. Frigate Congress in 1842-46; was present and assisted in capturing the whole of the Buenos Ayrean fleet by that vessel off Montevideo; joined the Richmond in September 1860; was in the action with Fort McRea, the Head of the Passes of the Mississippi, Forts Jackson and St. Philip, the Chalmettes, the rebel ironclads and gunboats below New Orleans, Vicksburg, Port Hudson, and at the surrender of New Orleans.

Avery

James

8

5

1864

Seaman

1825

Scotland

NY

71

Served on board the USS Metacomet. As a member of the boat's crew which went to the rescue of the monitor USS Tecumseh when that vessel was struck by a torpedo in passing the enemy forts in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864, S/man Avery braved the enemy fire which was said by the admiral to be "one of the most galling" he had ever seen, and aided in rescuing from death 10 of the crew of the Tecumseh, eliciting the admiration of both friend and foe.

Baker

Charles

8

5

1864

Quarter Gunner

1809

DC (Georgetown)

 

--

71

(Entered service at New York, NY.) Served on board the USS Metacomet. As a member of the boat's crew which went to the rescue of the monitor USS Tecumseh when that vessel was struck by a torpedo in passing the enemy forts in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864, Q.G. Baker braved the enemy fire which was said by the admiral to be "one of the most galling" he had ever seen, and aided in rescuing from death 10 of the crew of the Tecumseh, eliciting the admiration of both friend and foe.

Baldwin

Charles

5

25

1864

Coal Heaver

1839

Delaware

PA

45

Serving on board the USS Wyalusing and participating in a plan to destroy the rebel ram Albermarle in Roanoke River, 25 May 1864. Volunteering for the hazardous mission, C.H. Baldwin participated in the transfer of 2 torpedoes across an island swamp. Weighted by a line which was used to transfer the torpedoes, he swam the river and, when challenged by a sentry, was forced to abandon the plan after erasing its detection and before it could be carried to completion. Escaping the fire of the muskets, C.H. Baldwin spent 2 days and nights of hazardous travel without food, and finally arrived, fatigued, at the mother ship.

Barnum

James

1

14

1865

Boatswain's Mate

1816

MA

MA

59

Barnum served on board the USS New Ironsides during action in several attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 Dec 1864; and on 13, 14, and 15 Jan 1865. The ship steamed in and took the lead in the ironclad division close in shore and immediately opened its starboard battery in a barrage of well-directed fire to cause several fires and explosions and dismount several guns during the first 2 days of fighting. Taken under fire as she steamed into position on 13 Jan, the New Ironsides fought all day and took on ammunition at night despite severe weather conditions. When the enemy came out of his bombproofs to defend the fort against the storming party, the ship's battery disabled nearly every gun on the fort facing the shore before the cease-fire orders were given by the flagship. Barnum was commended for highly meritorious conduct during this period.

Barter

Gurdon H.

1

14

1865

Landsman

1843

NY (Williamsburgh)

NY

59

On board the USS Minnesota in action during the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 Jan 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, L/man Barter advanced to the top of the sand hill and partly through the breach in the palisades despite enemy fire which killed and wounded many officers and men. When more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, he remained with the party until dark, when it came safely away, bringing its wounded, its arms, and its colors.

Barton

Thomas

10

3

1862

Seaman

1831

OH (Cleveland)

OH

11

On board the USS Hunchback in the attack on Franklin, Va., 3 Oct 1862. When an ignited shell, with cartridge attached, fell out of the howitzer upon the deck, S/man Barton promptly seized a pail of water and threw it upon the missile, thereby preventing it from exploding.

Bass

David L.

1

14

1865

Seaman

1843

Ireland

NY

59

board the USS Minnesota in action during the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 Jan 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, S/man Bass advanced to the top of the sand hill and partly through the breach in the palisades despite enemy fire which killed and wounded many officers and men. When more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, he remained with the party until dark, when it came safely away, bringing its wounded, its arms, and its colors.

Bazaar

Philip

1

14

1865

Ordinary Seaman

---

Chile

MA

59

On board the USS Santiago de Cuba during the assault on Fort Fisher on 15 Jan 1865. As one of a boat crew detailed to one of the generals on shore, O.S. Bazaar bravely entered the fort in the assault and accompanied his party in carrying dispatches at the height of the battle. He was 1 of 6 men who entered the fort in the assault from the fleet.

Bell

George

11

7

1861

Captain of the Afterguard

1839

England

NY

17

Served as pilot of the USS Santee when that vessel was engaged in cutting out the rebel armed schooner Royal Yacht from Galveston Bay, 7 November 1861, and evinced more coolness, in passing the 4 forts and the rebel steamer General Rusk, than was ever before witnessed by his commanding officer. "Although severely wounded in the encounter, he displayed extraordinary courage under the most painful and trying circumstances."

Betham

Asa

1

14

1865

Coxswain

1838

NY

NY

59

Served on board the USS Pontoosuc during the capture of Fort Fisher and Wilmington, 24 Dec 1864, to 22 Jan 1865. Carrying out his duties faithfully during this period, Betham was recommended for gallantry and skill and for his cool courage while under the fire of the enemy throughout these various actions.

Bibber

Charles J.

12

23

1864

Gunner's Mate

1838

ME (Portland)

ME

45

Bibber served on board the USS Agawam, as one of a volunteer crew of a powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher 23 Dec 1864. The powder boat, towed in by the Wilderness to prevent detection by the enemy, cast off and slowly steamed to within 300 yards of the beach. After fuses and fires had been lit and a second anchor with short scope let go to assure the boat's tailing inshore, the crew again boarded the Wilderness and proceeded a distance of 12 miles from shore. Less than 2 hours later the explosion took place, and the following day fires were observed still burning at the forts.

Bickford

John F.

6

19

1864

Captain of the Top

1843

ME (Tremont)

ME

45

Served on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Acting as the first loader of the pivot gun during this bitter engagement Bickford exhibited marked coolness and good conduct and was highly recommended for his gallantry under fire by his divisional officer.

Binder

Richard

1

14

1865

Sergeant, USMC

1840

PA (Philadelphia)

PA

--

On board the USS Ticonderoga during the attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 Dec 1864, and 13 to 15 Jan 1865. Despite heavy return fire by the enemy and the explosion of the 100-pounder Parrott rifle which killed 8 men and wounded 12 more, Sgt. Binder, as captain of a gun, performed his duties with skill and courage during the first 2 days of battle. As his ship again took position on the 13th, he remained steadfast as the Ticonderoga maintained a well-placed fire upon the batteries on shore, and thereafter, as she materially lessened the power of guns on the mound which had been turned upon our assaulting columns. During this action the flag was planted on one of the strongest fortifications possessed by the rebels.

Blagheen

William

8

5

1864

Ship's Cook

1832

England

NY

45

Served on board the USS Brooklyn during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. Stationed in the immediate vicinity of the shell whips which were twice cleared of men by bursting shells, Blagheen remained steadfast at his post and performed his duties in the powder division throughout the furious action which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Blair

Robert M.

1

14

1865

Boatswain's Mate

1836

VT (Peacham)

VT

59

Served on board the USS Pontoosuc during the capture of Fort Fisher and Wilmington, 24 Dec 1864 to 22 Jan 1865. Carrying out his duties faithfully throughout this period, Blair was recommended for gallantry and skill and for his cool courage while under the fire of the enemy throughout these actions.

Blake

Robert

12

25

1863

Contraband

---

--

VA

32

Entered service at: Virginia.  On board the U.S. Steam Gunboat Marblehead off Legareville, Stono River, 25 Dec 1863, in an engagement with the enemy on John's Island. Serving the rifle gun, Blake, an escaped slave, carried out his duties bravely throughout the engagement which resulted in the enemy's abandonment of positions, leaving a caisson and one gun behind.

Bois

Frank

7

10

1863

Quarter-master

1841

Canada

--

17

Entered service at: Northampton, MA. Served as quartermaster on board the USS Cincinnati during the attack on the Vicksburg batteries and at the time of her sinking, 27 May 1863. Engaging the enemy in a fierce battle, the Cincinnati, amidst an incessant fire of shot and shell, continued to fire her guns to the last, though so penetrated by enemy shellfire that her fate was sealed. Conspicuously cool in making signals throughout the battle, Bois, after all the Cincinnati's staffs had been shot away, succeeded in nailing the flag to the stump of the forestaff to enable this proud ship to go down, "with her colors nailed to the mast."

Bond

William

6

19

1864

Boatswain's Mate

1839

MA (Boston)

MA

45

Served on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Carrying out his duties courageously, Bond exhibited marked coolness and good conduct and was highly recommended for his gallantry under fire by his divisional officer.

Bourne

Thomas

4

24

1862

Seaman and Gun Captain

---

England

--

11

Entered service at New York. Served as captain of a gun on board the USS Varuna during an attack on Forts Jackson and St. Philip and while under fire and ramming by the rebel ship Morgan, 24 April 1862. During this action at extremely close range while his ship was under furious fire and was twice rammed by the rebel ship Morgan, Bourne remained steadfast at his gun and was instrumental in inflicting damage on the enemy until the Varuna, badly damaged and forced to beach, was finally sunk.

Bowman

Edward R.

1

14

1865

Quartermaster

1828

ME (Eastport)

ME

59

On board the USS Ticonderoga during attacks on Fort Fisher 13 to 15 Jan 1865. Despite severe wounds sustained during the action Bowman displayed outstanding courage in the performance of duty as his ship maintained its well-placed fire upon the batteries on shore, and thereafter, as she materially lessened the power of guns on the mound which had been turned upon our assaulting columns. During this battle the flag was planted on one of the strongest fortifications possessed by the rebels.

Bradley

Amos

4

24

1862

Landsman

1837

NY (Danville)

NY

11

Served on board the USS Varuna in one of the most responsible positions, during the attacks on Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and while in action against the rebel ship Morgan, 24 April 1862. Although guns were raking the decks from behind him, Bradley remained steadfast at the wheel throughout the thickest of the fight, continuing at his station and rendering service with the greatest courage until his ship, repeatedly holed and twice rammed by the rebel ship Morgan, was beached and sunk.

Bradley

Charles

4

3

1863

Boatswain's Mate

1838

Ireland

NY

11

Served on board the USS Louisville. Carrying out his duties through the thick of battle and acting as captain of a 9-inch gun, Bradley consistently showed, "Attention to duty, bravery, and coolness in action against the enemy."

Brazell

John

8

5

1864

Quartermaster

1837

PA (Philadelphia)

PA

45

Served on board the USS Richmond in the action at Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864, where he was recommended for coolness and good conduct as a gun captain during that engagement which resulted in the capture of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the destruction of Fort Morgan. Brazell served gallantly throughout the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, the Chalmettes, batteries below Vicksburg, and was present at the surrender of New Orleans while on board the USS Brooklyn.

Breen

John

10

3

1863

Boatswain's Mate

1827

NY

NY

11

On board the USS Commodore Perry in the attack upon Franklin, Va., 3 Oct 1862. With enemy fire raking the deck of his ship and blockades thwarting her progress, Breen remained at his post and performed his duties with skill and courage as the Commodore Perry fought a gallant battle to silence many rebel batteries as she steamed down the Blackwater River.

Brennan

Christopher

4

24

1862

Seaman

1832

Ireland

MA

17

On board the USS Mississippi during attacks on Forts Jackson and St. Philip and during the taking of New Orleans, 24-25 April 1862. Taking part in the actions which resulted in the damaging of the Mississippi and several casualties on it, Brennan showed skill and courage throughout the entire engagements which resulted in the taking of St. Philip and Jackson and in the surrender of New Orleans.

Brinn

Andrew

3

14

1863

Seaman

---

Scotland

--

17

(Entered service at New York.) Served on board the USS Mississippi during her abandonment and firing in the engagement at Port Hudson, 14 March 1863. Remaining under enemy fire for 21/2 hours, Brinn remained on board the grounded vessel until all the abandoning crew had landed. After asking to be assigned some duty, he was finally ordered to save himself and to leave the Mississippi which had been deliberately fired to prevent her falling into rebel hands.

Brown

James

5

4

1863

Quarter-master

1826

NY (Rochester)

NY

32

Served on board the USS Albatross during action against Fort De Russy in the Red River Area on 4 May 1863. After the steering wheel and wheel ropes had been shot away by rebel fire, Brown stood on the gun platform of the quarterdeck, exposing himself to a close fire of musketry from the shore, and rendered invaluable assistance by his expert management of the relieving tackles in extricating the vessel from a perilous position, and thereby aided in the capture of Fort De Russy's heavy works.

Brown

John

8

5

1864

Captain of the Forecastle

1826

Scotland

NY

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks from stem to stern, Brown fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Brown

Robert

8

5

1864

Captain of the Top

1830

Norway

NY

45

On board the USS Richmond in action at Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864. Cool and courageous at his station throughout the prolonged action. Brown rendered gallant service as his vessel trained her guns on Fort Morgan and on ships of the Confederacy despite extremely heavy return fire. He participated in the actions at Forts Jackson and St. Philip, with the Chalmette batteries, at the surrender of New Orleans and in the attacks on batteries below Vicksburg.

Brown

William H.

8

5

1864

Landsman

1836

MD (Baltimore)

MD

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during successful attacks against Fort Morgan rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864. Stationed in the immediate vicinity of the shell whips which were twice cleared of men by bursting shells, Brown remained steadfast at his post and performed his duties in the powder division throughout the furious action which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Brown

Wilson

8

5

1864

Landsman

1841

MS (Natchez)

MS

45

On board the flagship USS Hartford during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864. Knocked unconscious into the hold of the ship when an enemy shell burst fatally wounded a man on the ladder above him, Brown, upon regaining consciousness, promptly returned to the shell whip on the berth deck and zealously continued to perform his duties although 4 of the 6 men at this station had been either killed or wounded by the enemy's terrific fire.

Brownell

William P.

5

2

1863

Coxswain

1838

NY

NY

32

Served as coxswain on board the USS Benton during the attack on Great Gulf Bay, 2 May 1863, and Vicksburg, 22 May 1863. Carrying out his duties with coolness and courage, Brownell served gallantly against the enemy as captain of a 9-inch gun in the attacks on Great Gulf and Vicksburg and as a member of the Battery Benton before Vicksburg.

Brutsche

Henry

10

31

1864

Landsman

1846

PA (Philadelphia)

PA

45

Served on board the USS Tacony during the taking of Plymouth, N.C., 31 Oct 1864. Carrying out his duties faithfully during the capture of Plymouth, Brutsche distinguished himself by a display of coolness when he participated in landing and spiking a 9-inch gun while under a devastating fire from enemy musketry.

Buck

James

4

24

1862

Quartermaster

1808

MD (Baltimore)

--

11

Served on board the USS Brooklyn in the attack upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip and at the taking of New Orleans, 24 and 25 April 1862. Although severely wounded by a heavy splinter, Buck continued to perform his duty until positively ordered below. Later stealing back to his post, he steered the ship for 8 hours despite his critical condition. His bravery was typical of the type which resulted in the taking of the Forts Jackson and St. Philip and in the capture of New Orleans.

Burns

John M.

8

5

1864

Seaman

1835

NY (Hudson)

NY

45

On board the USS Lackawanna during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. Although severely wounded and sent below under the surgeon's charge, Burns promptly returned to his station and assisted the powder division throughout the prolonged action which resulted in the capture of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of Fort Morgan.

Burton

Albert

1

14

1865

Seaman

1838

England

NY

59

Served on board the USS Wabash in the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 Jan 1865. Advancing gallantly through the severe enemy fire while armed only with a revolver and cutlass which made it impossible to return the fire at that range, Burton succeeded in reaching the angle of the fort and going on, to be one of the few who entered the fort. When the rest of the body of men to his rear were forced to retreat under a devastating fire, he was forced to withdraw through lack of support, and to seek the shelter of one of the mounds near the stockade from which point he succeeded in regaining the safety of his ship.

Butts

George

5

5

1864

Gunner's Mate

---

NY (Rome)

OH

45

Served on board the USS Signal, Red River, 5 May 1864. Proceeding up the Red River, the USS Signal engaged a large force of enemy field batteries and sharpshooters, returning their fire until the ship was totally disabled, at which time the white flag was raised. Although entered on the sick list, Butts courageously carried out his duties during the entire engagement.

Byrnes

James

3

3

1863

Boatswain's Mate

1838

Ireland

NY

11

Served on board the USS Louisville. Carrying out his duties through the thick of battle and acting as captain of a 9-inch gun, Brynes consistently showed "Attention to duty, bravery, and coolness in action against the enemy."

Campbell

William

1

14

1865

Boatswain's Mate

1838

IN

IN

59

On board the USS Ticonderoga during attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 Dec 1864; and 13 to 15 Jan 1865. Despite heavy return fire by the enemy and the explosion of the 100-pounder Parrott rifle which killed 8 men and wounded 12 more, Campbell, as captain of a gun, performed his duties with skill and courage during the first 2 days of battle. As his ship again took position on the line of the 13th, he remained steadfast as the Ticonderoga maintained a well-placed fire upon the batteries on shore, and thereafter, as she materially lessened the power of guns on the mound which had been turned upon our assaulting columns. During this action the flag was planted on one of the strongest fortifications possessed by the rebels.

Carr

William M.

8

5

1864

Master-at-Arms

---

MD (Baltimore)

--

45

On board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Carr performed his duties with skill and courage throughout the prolonged battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the successful attacks carried out on Fort Morgan.

Cassidy

Michael

8

5

1864

Landsman

1837

Ireland

NY

45

Served on board the USS Lackawanna during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee, in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Displaying great coolness and exemplary behavior as first sponger of a gun, Cassidy, by his coolness under fire, received the applause of his officers and the gun crew throughout the action which resulted in the capture of the prize ram Tennessee and in the destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Chandler

James B.

8

5

1864

Coxswain

1838

MA

MA

45

On board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Cool and courageous although he had just come off the sick list, Chandler rendered gallant service throughout the prolonged action as his ship maintained accurate fire against Fort Morgan and ships of the Confederacy despite extremely heavy return fire. He participated in the actions at Forts Jackson and St. Philip, with the Chalmette batteries, at the surrender of New Orleans and in the attacks on batteries below Vicksburg.

Chaput

Louis G.

8

5

1864

Landsman

1845

Canada

NY

45

On board the USS Lackawanna during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the rebel ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Severely wounded, Chaput remained at his gun until relieved, reported to the surgeon and returned to his gun until the action was over. He was then carried below following the action which resulted in the capture of the prize ram Tennessee and in destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Cllfford

Robert T.

8

22

1863

Master-at-Arms

1835

PA

PA

45

Served on board the USS Shokokon at New Topsail Inlet off Wilmington, N.C., 22 August 1863. Participating in a strategic plan to destroy an enemy schooner, Clifford aided in the portage of a dinghy across the narrow neck of land separating the sea from the sound. Launching the boat in the sound, the crew approached the enemy from the rear and Clifford gallantly crept into the rebel camp and counted the men who outnumbered his party 3 to 1. Returning to his men, he ordered a charge in which the enemy was routed, leaving behind a schooner and a quantity of supplies.

Colbert

Patrick

10

31

1864

Coxswain

1840

Ireland

NY

45

Served on board the USS Commodore Hull at the capture of Plymouth, 31 Oct 1864. Painfully wounded by a shell which killed the man at his side, Colbert, as captain of the forward pivot gun, remained at his post until the end of the action, braving the heavy enemy fire and appearing as cool as if at mere target practice.

Conlan

Dennis

12

23

1864

Seaman

1838

NY (New York)

NY

45

Conlan served on board the USS Agawam, as one of a volunteer crew of a powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher, 23 Dec 1864. The powder boat, towed in by the Wilderness to prevent detection by the enemy, cast off and slowly steamed to within 300 yards of the beach. After fuses and fires had been lit and a second anchor with short scope let go to assure the boat's tailing inshore, the crew again boarded the Wilderness and proceeded a distance of 12 miles from shore. Less than 2 hours later the explosion took place, and the following day fires were observed still burning at the forts.

Connor

Thomas

1

14

1865

Ordinary Seaman

1842

Ireland

MD

59

On board the USS Minnesota, in action during the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 Jan 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, Connor charged up to the palisades and, when more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, risked his life to remain with a wounded officer. With the enemy concentrating his fire on the group, he waited until after dark before assisting in carrying the wounded man from the field.

Connor

William C.

9

25

1864

Boatswain's Mate

1832

PA

PA

45

Served on board the USS Howquah on the occasion of the destruction of the blockade runner Lynx, off Wilmington, 25 September 1864. Performing his duty faithfully under the most trying circumstances, Connor stood firmly at his post in the midst of a crossfire from the rebel shore batteries and our own vessels.

Cooper

John

8

5

1864

Coxswain

1832

Ireland

NY

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee, in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks from stem to stern, Cooper fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Corcoran

Thomas E.

5

27

1863

Landsman

1838

NY

NY

17

Served on board the USS Cincinnati during the attack on the Vicksburg batteries and at the time of her sinking. Engaging the enemy in a fierce battle, the Cincinnati, amidst an incessant fire of shot and shell, continued to fire her guns to the last, though so penetrated by shellfire that her fate was sealed. Serving bravely during this action, Corcoran was conspicuously cool under the fire of the enemy, never ceasing to fight until this proud ship went down, "her colors nailed to the mast."

Cotton

Peter

12

25

1862

Ordinary Seaman

1839

NY

NY

11

Cotton served on board the USS Baron De Kalb in the Yazoo River expedition, 23 to 27 Dec 1862. Proceeding under orders up the Yazoo River, the Baron De Kalb, with the object of capturing or destroying the enemy's transports, came upon the steamers John Walsh, R. J. Locklan, Golden Age and the Scotland, sunk on a bar where they were ordered to be burned. Continuing up the river, the Baron De Kalb was fired upon but, upon returning the fire, caused the enemy's retreat. Returning down the Yazoo, she destroyed and captured large quantities of enemy equipment and several prisoners. Serving bravely throughout this action, Cotton, as coxswain "distinguished himself in the various actions."

Crawford

Alexander

5

25

1864

Fireman

1842

PA

PA

45

On board the USS Wyalusing, Crawford volunteered 25 May 1864, in a night attempt to destroy the rebel ram Albemarle in the Roanoke River. Taking part in a plan to explode the rebel ram Albemarle, Crawford executed his part in the plan with perfection, but upon being discovered, was forced to abandon the plan and retire leaving no trace of the evidence. After spending two hazardous days and nights without food, he gained the safety of a friendly ship and was then transferred back to the Wyalusing. Though the plan failed his skill and courage in preventing detection were an example of unfailing devotion to duty.

Cripps

Thomas

8

5

1864

Quartermaster

1837

PA (Philadelphia)

PA

45

As captain of a gun on board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Cripps fought his gun with skill and courage throughout a furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Cronin

Cornelius

8

5

1864

Chief Quartermaster

1836

MI

MI

45

On board the USS Richmond in action at Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864. Cool and vigilant at his station throughout the prolonged action, Cronin watched for signals and skillfully steered the ship as she trained her guns on Fort Morgan and on ships of the Confederacy despite extremely heavy return fire. He participated in the actions at Forts Jackson and St. Philip, with the Chalmette batteries, at the surrender of New Orleans, and in the attacks on batteries below Vicksburg.

Davis

John

2

10

1862

Quarter Gunner

---

NJ (Cedarville)

NJ

11

Served on board the USS Valley City during action against rebel fort batteries and ships off Elizabeth City, N.C., on 10 February 1862. When a shell from the shore penetrated the side and passed through the magazine, exploding outside the screen on the berth deck, several powder division protecting bulkheads were torn to pieces and the forward part of the berth deck set on fire. Showing great presence of mind, Davis courageously covered a barrel of powder with his own body and prevented an explosion, while at the same time passing powder to provide the division on the upper deck while under fierce enemy fire.

Davis

Samuel W.

8

5

1864

Ordinary Seaman

1845

ME

ME

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks from stem to stern, Davis exercised extreme courage and vigilance while acting as a look-out for torpedoes and other obstructions throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Deakin

Charles

8

5

1864

Boatswain's Mate

1837

NY (New York)

PA

45

As captain of a gun on board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Deakin fought his gun with skill and courage throughout a furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan. He also participated in the actions at Forts Jackson and St. Philip.

Dempster

John

1

14

1865

Coxswain

1839

Scotland

PA

59

Dempster served on board the USS New Ironsides during action in several attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 Dec 1864; and 13, 14, and 15 Jan 1865. The ship steamed in and took the lead in the ironclad division close inshore and immediately opened its starboard battery in a barrage of well-directed fire to cause several fires and explosions and dismount several guns during the first 2 days of fighting. Taken under fire as she steamed into position on 13 Jan, the New Ironsides fought all day and took on ammunition at night despite severe weather conditions. When the enemy came out of his bombproofs to defend the fort against the storming party, the ship's battery disabled nearly every gun on the fort facing the shore before the cease-fire orders were given by the flagship.

Denig

Henry J.

8

5

1864

Sergeant, USMC

1839

PA (York)

PA

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee, in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Sgt. Denig fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Denning

Lorenzo

10

27

1864

Landsman

1843

CT

--

45

(Entered service at New York.) Denning served on board the U.S. Picket Boat No. 1 in action, 27 Oct 1864, against the Confederate ram Albemarle which had resisted repeated attacks by our steamers and had kept a large force of vessels employed in watching her. The picket boat, equipped with a spar torpedo, succeeded in passing the enemy pickets within 20 yards without being discovered and then made for the Albemarle under a full head of steam. Immediately taken under fire by the ram, the small boat plunged on, jumped the log boom which encircled the target and exploded its torpedo under the port bow of the ram. The picket boat was destroyed by enemy fire and almost the entire crew taken prisoner or lost.

Dennis

Richard

8

5

1864

Boatswain's Mate

1826

MA

MA

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks from stem to stern, Dennis displayed outstanding skill and courage in operating the torpedo catcher and in assisting in working the bow chasers throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Densmore

William

8

5

1864

Chief Boatswain's Mate

1834

NY

NY

45

As captain of a gun on board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Densmore fought his gun with skill and courage throughout a furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Diggins

Bartholomew

8

5

1864

Ordinary Seaman

1842

MD (Baltimore)

MD

391

On board the flagship, USS Hartford, during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Diggins, as loader of a gun, remained steadfast at his post throughout the furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Ditzenback

John

12

6

1864

Quartermaster

1828

NY (New York)

IN

59

Served on board the U.S. Monitor Neosho during the engagement with enemy batteries at Bells Mills, Cumberland River, near Nashville, Tenn., 6 Dec 1864. Carrying out his duties courageously during the engagement, Ditzenback gallantly left the pilot house after the flag and signal staffs of that vessel had been shot away and, taking the flag which was drooping over the wheelhouse, made it fast to the stump of the highest mast remaining, although the ship was still under a heavy fire from the enemy.

Donnelly

John

8

5

1864

Ordinary Seaman

1839

England

NY

71

Served on board the USS Metacomet. As a member of the boat's crew which went to the rescue of the U.S. Monitor Tecumseh when that vessel was struck by a torpedo in passing the enemy forts in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864, Donnelly braved the enemy fire which was said by the admiral to be "one of the most galling" he had ever seen and aided in rescuing from death 10 of the crew of the Tecumseh, eliciting the admiration of both friend and foe.

Doolen

William

8

5

1864

Coal Heaver

1841

Ireland

PA

45

On board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Although knocked down and seriously wounded in the head, Doolen refused to leave his station as shot and shell passed. Calm and courageous, he rendered gallant service throughout the prolonged battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the successful attacks carried out on Fort Morgan despite the enemy's heavy return fire.

Dorman

John

--

--

1864

Seaman

1843

OH (Cincinnati)

OH

32

Served on board the USS Carondelet in various actions of that vessel. Carrying out his duties courageously throughout the actions of the Carondelet, Dorman, although wounded several times invariably returned to duty and constantly presented an example of devotion to the flag.

Dougherty

Patrick

8

5

1864

Landsman

1844

Ireland

NY

45

As a landsman on board the USS Lackawanna, Dougherty acted gallantly without orders when the powder box at his gun was disabled under the heavy enemy fire, and maintained a supply of powder throughout the prolonged action. Dougherty also aided in the attacks on Fort Morgan and in the capture of the prize ram Tennessee.

Dow

Henry

8

27

1863

Boatswain's Mate

1840

Scotland

IL

45

While serving on board the USS Cincinnati during the attack on the Vicksburg batteries and at the time of her sinking, 27 May 1863. Engaging the enemy in a fierce battle, the Cincinnati, amidst an incessant fire of shot and shell, continued to fire her guns to the last, though so penetrated by enemy shellfire that her fate was sealed. Serving courageously throughout this action, Dow carried out his duties to the end on this proud ship that went down with "her colors nailed to the mast."

Duncan

Adam

8

5

1864

Boatswain's Mate

1833

ME

ME

45

As captain of a gun on board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Duncan fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the prolonged battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the successful attacks carried out on Fort Morgan.

Duncan

James K. L.

3

2

1864

Ordinary Seaman

1845

PA (Frankfort)

PA

32

Served on board the USS Fort Hindman during the engagement near Harrisonburg, La., 2 March 1864. Following a shellburst at one of the guns which started a fire at the cartridge tie, Duncan immediately seized the burning cartridge, took it from the gun and threw it overboard, despite the immediate danger to himself. Carrying out his duties through the entire engagement, Duncan served courageously during this action in which the Fort Hindman was raked severely with shot and shell from the enemy guns.

Dunn

William

1

14

1865

Quartermaster

---

ME

ME

59

On board the USS Monadnock in action during several attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 Dec 1864; and 13, 14, and 15 Jan 1865. With his ship anchored well inshore to insure perfect range against the severe fire of rebel guns, Dunn continued his duties when the vessel was at anchor, as her propellers were kept in motion to make her turrets bear, and the shooting away of her chain might have caused her to ground. Disdainful of shelter despite severe weather conditions, he inspired his shipmates and contributed to the success of his vessel in reducing the enemy guns to silence.

Dunphy

Richard D.

8

5

1864

Coal Heaver

1840

Ireland

NY

--

On board the flagship USS Hartford during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the rebel ram Tennessee, Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. With his ship under terrific enemy shellfire, Dunphy performed his duties with skill and courage throughout this fierce engagement which resulted in the capture of the rebel ram Tennessee.

Edwards

John

8

5

1864

Captain of the Top

1831

RI (Providence)

RI

45

As second captain of a gun on board the USS Lackawanna during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. Wounded when an enemy shell struck, Edwards refused to go below for aid and, as heavy return fire continued to strike his vessel, took the place of the first captain and carried out his duties during the prolonged action which resulted in the capture of the prize ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

English

Thomas

1

14

1865

Signal Quartermaster

1819

NY (New York)

NY

59

English served on board the USS New Ironsides during action in several attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 Dec 1864; and 13, 14, and 15 Jan 1865. The ship steamed in and took the lead in the ironclad division close inshore and immediately opened its starboard battery in a barrage of well-directed fire to cause several fires and explosions and dismount several guns during the first 2 days of fighting. Taken under fire as she steamed into position on 13 Jan, the New Ironsides fought all day and took on ammunition at night despite severe weather conditions. When the enemy came out of his bombproofs to defend the fort against the storming party, the ship's battery disabled nearly every gun on the fort facing the shore before the cease-fire orders were given by the flagship.

Erickson

John P.

1

14

1865

Captain of the Forecastle

---

England (London)

NY

59

Served on board the USS Pontoosuc during the capture of Fort Fisher and Wilmington, 24 Dec 1864, to 22 February 1865. Carrying out his duties faithfully throughout this period, Erickson was so severely wounded in the assault upon Fort Fisher that he was sent to the hospital at Portsmouth, Va. Erickson was recommended for his gallantry, skill, and coolness in action while under the fire of the enemy.

Farley

William

12

25

1863

Boatswain's Mate

1835

ME (Whitefield)

ME

32

Served on board the USS Marblehead off Legareville, Stono River, 25 Dec 1863, during an engagement with the enemy on John's Island. Behaving in a gallant manner, Farley animated his men and kept up a rapid and effective fire on the enemy throughout the engagement which resulted in the enemy's abandonment of his positions, leaving a caisson and 1 gun behind.

Farrell

Edward

4

24

1862

Quartermaster

1833

NY (Saratoga)

NY

11

Served on board the USS Owasco during the attack upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 24 April 1862. Stationed at the masthead during these operations, Farrell observed and reported the effect of the fire of our guns in such a manner as to make his intelligence, coolness and capacity conspicuous.

Ferrell

John H.

12

6

1864

Pilot

1823

TN

--

59

(Entered service at Illinois.) Served on board the monitor USS Neosho during the engagement with enemy batteries at Bells Mills, Cumberland River, near Nashville, Tenn., 6 Dec 1864. Carrying out his duties courageously during the engagement, Ferrell gallantly left the pilothouse after the flag and signal staffs of that vessel had been shot away and, taking the flag which was drooping over the wheelhouse, make it fast to the stump of the highest mast remaining although the ship was still under a heavy fire from the enemy.

Fitzpatrick

Thomas

8

5

1864

Coxswain

1837

Canada

--

45

As captain of the No. 1 gun on board the flagship USS Hartford, during action against rebel gunboats, the ram Tennessee and Fort Morgan in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Although struck several times in the face by splinters, and with his gun disabled when a shell burst between the 2 forward 9-inch guns, killing and wounding 15 men, Fitzpatrick, within a few minutes, had the gun in working order again with new track, breeching and side tackle, had sent the wounded below, cleared the area of other casualties, and was fighting his gun as before. He served as an inspiration to the members of his crew and contributed to the success of the action in which the Tennessee was captured.

Flood

Thomas

4

24

1862

Boy

1840

Ireland

NY

11

Served on board the USS Pensacola in the attack on Forts Jackson and St. Philip and at the taking of new Orleans, 24 and 25 April 1862. Swept from the bridge by a shell which wounded the signal quartermaster, Flood returned to the bridge after assisting the wounded man below and taking over his duties, "Performed them with coolness, exactitude and the fidelity of a veteran seaman. His intelligence and character cannot be spoken of too warmly."

Foy

Charles H.

1

14

1865

Signal Quartermaster

---

NH (Portsmouth)

NH

59

on board the USS Rhode Island during the action with Fort Fisher and the Federal Point batteries, 13 to 15 Jan 1865. Carrying out his duties courageously during the battle, Foy continued to be outstanding by his good conduct and faithful services throughout this engagement which resulted in a heavy casualty list when an attempt was made to storm Fort Fisher.

Franks

William J.

3

5

1864

Seaman

1830

NC (Chatham County)

--

32

(Entered service at Duvalls Bluff, Ark.) Served on board the USS Marmora off Yazoo City, Miss., 5 March 1864. Embarking from the Marmora with a 12-pound howitzer mounted on a field carriage, Franks landed with the gun and crew in the midst of heated battle and, bravely standing by his gun despite enemy rifle fire which cut the gun carriage and rammer contributed to the turning back of the enemy during the fierce engagement.

Freeman

Martin

8

5

1864

Pilot

1814

Germany

--

45

(Entered service at Louisiana.) As pilot of the flagship, USS Hartford, during action against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee, in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. With his ship under terrific enemy shellfire, Freeman calmly remained at his station in the maintop and skillfully piloted the ships into the bay. He rendered gallant service throughout the prolonged battle in which the rebel gunboats were captured or driven off, the prize ram Tennessee forced to surrender, and the fort successfully attacked.

Frisbee

John B.

4

24

1862

Gunner's Mate

1822

ME

ME

11

Served on board the U.S. Steam Gunboat Pinola during action against Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and during the taking of New Orleans, 24 April 1862. While engaged in the bombardment of Fort St. Philip, Frisbee, acting courageously and without personal regard, closed the powder magazine which had been set afire by enemy shelling and shut off his avenue of escape, thereby setting a high example of bravery. He served courageously throughout these engagements which resulted in the taking of the Forts Jackson and St. Philip and in the surrender of New Orleans.

Fry

Isaac N.

1

14

1865

Orderly Sergeant, USMC

---

--

PA

59

On board the USS Ticonderoga during attacks on Fort Fisher, 13 to 15 Jan 1865. As orderly sergeant of marine guard, and captain of a gun, Orderly Sgt. Fry performed his duties with skill and courage as the Ticonderoga maintained a well-placed fire upon the batteries to the left of the palisades during the initial phases of the 3-day battle, and thereafter, as she considerably lessened the firing power of guns on the mount which had been turned upon our assaulting columns. During this action the flag was planted on one of the strongest fortifications possessed by the rebels.

Gardner

William

8

5

1864

Seaman

1832

Ireland

NY

45

As seaman on board the USS Galena in the engagement at Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Serving gallantly during this fierce battle which resulted in the capture of the rebel ram Tennessee and the damaging of Fort Morgan. Gardner behaved with conspicuous coolness under the fire of the enemy.

Garrison

James R.

8

5

1864

Coal Heaver

1840

NY (Poughkeepsie)

NY

45

On board the flagship, USS Hartford, during successful engagements against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. When a shell struck his foot and severed one of his toes, Garrison remained at his station at the shell whip and, after crudely bandaging the wound, continued to perform his duties until severely wounded by another shell burst.

Garvin

William

12

23

1864

Captain of the Forecastle

1835

--

VA

45

Garvin served on board the USS Agawam, as one of a volunteer crew of a powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher, 23 Dec 1864. The powder boat, towed in by the Wilderness to prevent detection by the enemy, cast off and slowly steamed to within 300 yards of the beach. After fuses and fires had been lit and a second anchor with short scope let go to assure the boat's tailing inshore, the crew again boarded the Wilderness and proceeded a distance of 12 miles from shore. Less than 2 hours later the explosion took place, and the following day fires were observed still burning at the fort.

George

Daniel G.

10

27

1864

Ordinary Seaman

1840

NH (Plaistow)

NH

45

(Real name is William Smith) George served on board U.S. Picket Boat No. 1, in action 27 Oct 1864, against the Confederate ram, Albemarle, which had resisted repeated attacks by our steamers and had kept a large force of vessels employed in watching her. The picket boat, equipped with a spar torpedo, succeeded in passing the enemy pickets within 20 yards without being discovered and then made for the Albemarle under a full head of steam. Immediately taken under fire by the ram, the small boat plunged on, jumped the log boom which encircled the target and exploded its torpedo under the port bow of the ram. The picket boat was destroyed by enemy fire and almost the entire crew taken prisoner or lost.

Gile

Frank S.

11

16

1863

Landsman

1845

MA

MA

32

On board the USS Lehigh, Charleston Harbor, 16 November 1863, during the hazardous task of freeing the Lehigh, which had been grounded, and was under heavy enemy fire from Fort Moultrie. After several previous attempts had been made, Gile succeeded in passing in a small boat from the Lehigh to the Nahant with a line bent on a hawser. This courageous action while under severe enemy fire enabled the Lehigh to be freed from her helpless position.

Graham

Robert

10

31

1864

Landsman

1841

England

NY

45

Served on board the USS Tacony during the taking of Plymouth, N.C., 31 Oct 1864. Carrying out his duties faithfully during the capture of Plymouth, Graham distinguished himself by a display of coolness when he participated in landing and spiking a 9-inch gun while under a devastating fire from enemy musketry.

Greene

John

4

24

1862

Captain of the Forecastle

---

--

--

11

(Entered service at New York.) Captain of a gun on board the USS Varuna during the attacks on Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and while under fire and ramming by the rebel ship Morgan, 24 April 1862. During this action at extremely close range while his ship was under furious fire and twice rammed by the rebel ship Morgan, Greene remained steadfast at his gun throughout the thickest of the fight and was instrumental in inflicting damage on the enemy until the Varuna, badly damaged and forced to beach, was finally sunk.

Griffiths

John

1

14

1865

Captain of the Forecastle

1835

Wales

MA

59

On board the USS Santiago de Cuba during the assault on Fort Fisher on 15 Jan 1865. As one of a boatcrew detailed to one of the generals on shore, Griffiths bravely entered the fort in the assault and accompanied his party in carrying dispatches at the height of the battle. He was one of 6 men who entered the fort in the assault from the fleet.

Griswold

Luke M.

12

30

1862

Ordinary Seaman

1837

MA

MA

59

Served on board the USS Rhode Island which was engaged in saving the lives of the officers and crew of the Monitor, 30 Dec 1862. Participating in the hazardous rescue of the officers and crew of the sinking Monitor, Griswold, after rescuing several of the men, became separated in a heavy gale with other members of the cutter that had set out from the Rhode Island, and spent many hours in the small boat at the mercy of the weather and high seas until finally picked up by a schooner 50 miles east of Cape Hatteras.

Haffee

Edmund

1

14

1865

Quarter Gunner

1832

PA (Philadelphia)

PA

59

Haffee served on board the USS New Ironsides during action in several attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 Dec 1864; and 13, 14, and 15 Jan 1865. The ship steamed in and took the lead in the ironclad division close inshore, and immediately opened its starboard battery in a barrage of well-directed fire to cause several fires and explosions and dismount several guns during the first 2 days of fighting. Taken under fire, as she steamed into position on 13 Jan, the New Ironsides fought all day and took on ammunition at night despite severe weather conditions. When the enemy came out of his bombproof to defend the fort against the storming party, the ship's battery disabled nearly every gun on the fort facing the shore before the cease-fire orders were given by the flagship.

Haley

James

6

19

1864

Captain of the Forecastle

1824

Ireland

OH

45

Served as captain of the forecastle on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Acting as captain of a gun during the bitter engagement, Haley exhibited marked coolness and good conduct and was highly commended by his division officer for his gallantry and meritorious achievement under enemy fire.

Halstead

William

8

5

1864

Coxswain

1837

NY

NY

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee, in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks from stem to stern, Halstead fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Ham

Mark G.

6

19

1864

Carpenter's Mate

1820

NH (Portsmouth)

NH

45

Served on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Performing his duties intelligently and faithfully, Ham distinguished himself in the face of the bitter enemy fire and was highly commended by his divisional officer.

Hamilton

Hugh

8

5

1864

Coxswain

1830

NY

NY

45

On board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Hamilton performed his duties with skill and courage throughout the prolonged battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the successful attacks carried out on Fort Morgan.

Hamilton

Richard

10

27

1864

Coal Heaver

1836

PA (Philadelphia)

PA

45

Hamilton served on board the U.S. Picket Boat No. 1, in action, 27 Oct 1864, against the Confederate ram Albemarle which had resisted repeated attacks by our steamers and had kept a large force of vessels employed in watching her. The picket boat, equipped with a spar torpedo, succeeded in passing the enemy pickets within 20 yards without being discovered and then made for the Albemarle under a full head of steam. Immediately taken under fire by the ram, the small boat plunged on, jumped the log boom which encircled the target and exploded its torpedo under the port bow of the ram. The picket boat was destroyed by enemy fire and almost the entire crew taken prisoner or lost.

Hamilton

Thomas W.

5

27

1863

Quartermaster

1833

Scotland

MA

17

Serving as quartermaster on board the USS Cincinnati during the attack on the Vicksburg batteries and at the time of her sinking, 27 May 1863. Engaging the enemy in a fierce battle, the Cincinnati, amidst an incessant fire of shot and shell, continued to fire her guns to the last although so penetrated by enemy shell fire that her fate was sealed. Conspicuously gallant during this action, Hamilton, severely wounded at the wheel, returned to his post and had to be sent below, to hear the incessant roar of guns as the gallant ship went down, "her colors nailed to the mast."

Hand

Alexander

7

9

1862

Quartermaster

1836

DE

DE

11

Served on board the USS Ceres in the fight near Hamilton, Roanoke River, 9 July 1862. Fired on by the enemy with small arms, Hand courageously returned the raking enemy fire and was spoken of for "good conduct and cool bravery under enemy fire," by the commanding officer.

Harcourt

Thomas

1

14

1865

Ordinary Seaman

1841

MA (Boston)

MA

59

On board the USS Minnesota in action during the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 Jan 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, Harcourt advanced to the top of the sand hill and partly through the breach in the palisades despite enemy fire which killed and wounded many officers and men. When more than two-thirds of the men become seized with panic and retreated on the run, he remained with the party until dark when it came safely away, bringing its wounded, its arms and its colors.

Harding

Thomas

6

9

1864

Captain of the Forecastle

1837

CT (Middletown)

CT

45

Served as captain of the forecastle on board the USS Dacotah on the occasion of the destruction of the blockade runner Pevensey, near Beauford, N.C., 9 June 1864. "Learning that one of the officers in the boat, which was in danger of being, and subsequently was, swamped, could not swim, Harding remarked to him: 'If we are swamped, sir, I shall carry you to the beach or I will never go there myself.' He did not succeed in carrying out his promise, but made desperate efforts to do so, while others thought only of themselves. Such conduct is worthy of appreciation and admiration--a sailor risking his own life to save that of an officer."

Harley

Bernard

10

27

1864

Ordinary Seaman

1842

NY (Brooklyn)

NY

45

Harley served on board the U.S. Picket Boat No. 1, in action, 27 Oct 1864, against the Confederate ram Albemarle, which had resisted repeated attacks by our steamers and had kept a large force of vessels employed in watching her. The picket boat, equipped with a spar torpedo, succeeded in passing the enemy pickets within 20 yards without being discovered and then made for the Albemarle under a full head of steam. Immediately taken under fire by the ram, the small boat plunged on, jumped the log boom which encircled the target and exploded its torpedo under the port bow of the ram. The picket boat was destroyed by enemy fire and almost the entire crew taken prisoner or lost.

Harrington

Daniel

--

--

1863

Landsman

1849

Ireland

MA

11

Harrington, a landsman from the USS Pocahontas, participated in a shore mission to procure meat for the ship's crew. While returning to the beach, the party was fired on from ambush and several men killed or wounded. Cool and courageous throughout his action, Harrington rendered gallant service against the enemy and in administering to the casualties.

Harris

John

8

5

1864

Captain of the Forecastle

1839

Scotland

NY

17

As captain of the forecastle on board the USS Metacomet, Harris was a member of the boat's crew which went to the rescue of the officers and crew of the U.S. Monitor Tecumseh, when that vessel was struck by a torpedo in passing the enemy forts in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864 Harris braved the enemy fire which was said by the admiral to be "one of the most galling" he had ever seen, and aided in rescuing from death 10 of the crew of the Tecumseh, thereby eliciting the admiration of both friend and foe.

Harrison

George H.

6

19

1864

Seaman

1842

MA

MA

45

Served on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Acting as sponger and loader of the 11-inch pivot gun during the bitter engagement, Harrison exhibited marked coolness and good conduct and was highly recommended for his gallantry under fire by the divisional officer.

Hathaway

Edward W.

6

26

1862

Seaman

1838

MA (Plymouth)

--

--

(Entered service at Plymouth, Mass.) On board the USS Sciota prior to the battle Vicksburg, on 28 June 1862. Struck by a bullet which severed his left arm above the elbow, Hathaway displayed exceptional courage as his ship sustained numerous damaging hits from stem to stern while proceeding down the river to fight the battle of Vicksburg.

Hawkins

Charles

12

23

1864

Seaman

1834

Scotland

NH

45

Hawkins served on board the USS Agawam, as one of a volunteer crew of a powderboat which was exploded near Fort Fisher, 23 Dec 1864. The powderboat, towed in by the Wilderness to prevent detection by the enemy, cast off and slowly steamed to within 300 yards of the beach. After fuses and fires had been lit and a second anchor with short scope let go to assure the boat's tailing inshore, the crew again boarded the Wilderness and proceeded a distance of 12 miles from shore. Less than 2 hours later the explosion took place, and the following day fires were observed still burning at the forts.

Hayden

Joseph B.

1

14

1865

Quartermaster

1834

MD

MD

59

On board the USS Ticonderoga, as quartermaster in charge of steering the ship into action, during attacks on Fort Fisher, 13 to 15 Jan 1865. Hayden steered the ship into position in the line of battle where she maintained a well-directed fire upon the batteries to the left of the palisades during the initial phases of the engagement. Although several of the enemy's shots fell over and around the vessel, the Ticonderoga fought her guns gallantly throughout 3 consecutive days of battle until the flag was planted on one of the strongest fortifications possessed by the rebels.

Hayes

John

6

19

1864

Coxswain

1831

PA (Philadelphia)

PA

45

Served on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Acting as second captain of the No. 2 gun during this bitter engagement, Hayes exhibited marked coolness and good conduct and was highly recommended for his gallantry under fire by the divisional officer.

Hayes

Thomas

8

5

1864

Coxswain

1840

RI

RI

45

As Captain of No. 1 gun on board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Cool and courageous at his station throughout the prolonged action, Hayes maintained fire from his gun on Fort Morgan and on ships of the Confederacy despite extremely heavy return fire.

Hickman

John

3

14

1863

Second Class Fireman

1837

VA (Richmond)

VA

17

Served on board the USS Richmond in the attack on Port Hudson, 14 March 1863. Damaged by a 6-inch solid rifle shot which shattered the starboard safety-valve chamber and also damaged the port safety-valve, the fireroom of the USS Richmond immediately became filled with steam to place it in an extremely critical condition. Acting courageously in this crisis, Hickman persisted in penetrating the steam-filled room in order to haul the hot fires of the furnaces and continued this action until the gravity of the situation had been lessened.

Hinnecan

William

12

23

1864

Second Class Fireman

1841

Ireland

NY

45

Hinnegan served on board the USS Agawam, as one of a volunteer crew of powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher, 23 Dec 1864. The powder boat, towed in by the Wilderness to prevent detection by the enemy, cast off and slowly steamed to within 300 yards of the beach. After fuses and fires had been lit and a second anchor with short scope let go to assure the boat's tailing inshore, the crew again boarded the Wilderness and proceeded a distance of 12 miles from shore. Less than 2 hours later the explosion took place, and the following day fires were observed still burning at the forts.

Hollat

George

4

24

1862

Third Class Boy

---

--

--

11

(Entered service at New York.) Hollat served as third class boy on board the USS Varuna during an attack on Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 24 April 1862. He rendered gallant service through the perilous action and remained steadfast and courageous at his battle station despite extremely heavy fire and the ramming of the Varuna by the rebel ship Morgan, continuing his efforts until his ship, repeatedly holed and fatally damaged, was beached and sunk.

Horton

James

9

21

1864

Gunner's Mate

1838

MA

MA

59

Served as gunner's mate on board the USS Montauk, 21 September 1864. During the night of 21 September, when fire was discovered in the magazine lightroom of the vessel, causing a panic and demoralizing the crew, Horton rushed into the cabin, obtained the magazine keys, sprang into the lightroom and began passing out combustibles, Including the box of signals in which the fire originated.

Horton

Lewis A.

12

30

1862

Seaman

1839

MA (Bristol)

MA

59

Served on board the USS Rhode Island, which was engaged in saving the lives of the officers and crew of the Monitor, 30 Dec 1862. Participating in the hazardous task of rescuing the officers and crew of the sinking Monitor, Horton, after rescuing several of the men, became separated in a heavy gale with other members of the cutter that had set out from the Rhode Island and spent many hours in the small boat at the mercy of the weather and high seas until finally picked up by a schooner 50 miles east of Cape Hatteras.

Houghton

Edward J.

10

27

1864

Ordinary Seaman

1843

AL (Mobile)

AL

45

Houghton served on board the U.S. Picket Boat No. 1 in action, 27 Oct 1864, against the Confederate ram Albemarle, which had resisted repeated attacks by our steamers and had kept a large force of vessels employed in watching her. The picket boat, equipped with a spar torpedo, succeeded in passing the enemy pickets within 20 yards without being discovered and then made for the Albemarle under a full head of steam. Immediately taken under fire by the ram, the small boat plunged on, jumped the log boom which encircled the target and exploded its torpedo under the port bow of the ram. The picket boat was destroyed by enemy fire and almost the entire crew taken prisoner or lost.

Howard

Martin

10

31

1864

Landsman

1843

Ireland

NY

45

Served on board the USS Tacony during the taking of Plymouth, N.C., 31 Oct 1864. Carrying out his duties faithfully during the capture of Plymouth, Howard distinguished himself by a display of coolness when he participated in landing and spiking a 9-inch gun while under a devastating fire from enemy musketry.

Howard

Peter

3

14

1863

Boatswain's Mate

1829

France

MA

17

Served on board the USS Mississippi during the action against Port Hudson, 14 March 1863. Running aground during the darkness and in the midst of battle while exposed to a devastating fire from enemy shore batteries, the Mississippi was ordered abandoned after a long and desperate attempt to free her. Serving courageously throughout this period in which a steady fire was kept up against the enemy until the ship was enveloped in flames and abandoned. Howard acted gallantly in his duties as boatswain's mate. Soon after the firing of the Mississippi and its abandonment, it was seen to slide off the shoal, drift downstream and explode, leaving no possibility of its falling into enemy hands.

Hudson

Michael

8

5

1864

Sergeant, USMC

1834

Ireland (Sligo County)

NY

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked the decks, Sgt. Hudson fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee.

Huskey

Michael

3

--

1863

Fireman

1841

NY (New York)

NY

32

Fireman on board the USS Carondelet, Deer Creek Expedition, March 1863. Carrying out his duties gallantly, Huskey volunteered to aid in the rescue of the tug Ivy under the fire of the enemy, and set forth general meritorious conduct during this hazardous mission.

Hyland

John

5

5

1864

Seaman

1819

Ireland

IL

45

Served as seaman on board the USS Signal which was attacked by field batteries and sharpshooters and destroyed in Red River, 5 May 1864. Proceeding up the Red River, the USS Signal engaged a large force of enemy field batteries and sharpshooters, returning their fire until the ship was totally disabled, at which time the white flag was raised. Although wounded, Hyland courageously went in full view of several hundred sharpshooters and let go the anchor, and again to slip the cable, when he was again wounded by the raking enemy fire.

Irlam

Joseph

8

5

1864

Seaman

1840

England

NY

45

Stationed at the wheel on board the USS Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. When heavy enemy fire struck down several men at their guns and replacements were not available, Irlam voluntarily released 2 men who were stationed with him and carried on at the wheel with the assistance of only one of the crew throughout the furious battle.

Irving

John

8

5

1864

Coxswain

1839

NY (East Brooklyn)

NY

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee, in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks from stem to stern, Irving fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Irving

Thomas

11

16

1863

Coxswain

1842

England

NY

32

Served on board the USS Lehigh, Charleston Harbor, 16 November 1863, during the hazardous task of freeing the Lehigh, which had grounded, and was under heavy enemy fire from Fort Moultrie. Rowing the small boat which was used in the hazardous task of transferring hawsers from the Lehigh to the Nahant. Irving twice succeeded in making the trip, while under severe fire from the enemy, only to find that each had been in vain when the hawsers were cut by hostile fire and chaffing.

Irwin

Nicholas

8

5

1864

Seaman

1833

Denmark

NY

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee, in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks from stem to stern, Irwin fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

James

John H.

8

5

1864

Captain of the Top

1835

MA (Boston)

MA

45

As captain of a gun on board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, James fought his gun with skill and courage throughout a furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Jenkins

Thomas

5

27

1863

Seaman

---

---

--

17

Served on board the USS Cincinnati during the attack on the Vicksburg batteries and at the time of her sinking, 27 May 1863. Engaging the enemy in a fierce battle, the Cincinnati, amidst an incessant fire of shot and shell, continued to fire her guns to the last, though so penetrated by shell fire that her fate was sealed. Serving bravely during this action, Jenkins was conspicuously cool under the fire of the enemy, never ceasing to fight until this proud ship went down, "her colors nailed to the mast."

Johnson

Henry

8

5

1864

Seaman

1824

Norway

NY

82

As seaman on board the USS Metacomet, Johnson served as a member of the boat's crew which went to the rescue of the U.S. Monitor Tecumseh when that vessel was struck by a torpedo in passing the enemy forts in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. He braved the enemy fire which was said by the admiral to be "one of the most galling" he had ever seen, and aided in rescuing from death 10 of the crew of the Tecumseh, thereby eliciting the admiration of both friend and foe.

Johnston

William P.

3

2

1864

Landsman

---

IL (Chicago)

--

32

(Entered service at Chicago, Ill.)  Served on board the USS Fort Hindman during the engagement near Harrisonburg, La., 2 March 1864. Badly wounded in the hand during the action, Johnston, despite his wound, took the place of another man to sponge and lead one of the guns throughout the entire action in which the Fort Hindman was raked severely with shot and shell from the enemy guns.

Jones

Andrew

8

5

1864

Chief Boatswain's Mate

1835

Ireland

NY

45

Served as chief boatswain's mate on board the U.S. Ironclad, Chickasaw, Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Although his enlistment was up, Jones volunteered for the battle of Mobile Bay, going on board the Chickasaw from the Vincennes where he then carried out his duties gallantly throughout the engagement with the enemy which resulted in the capture of the rebel ram Tennessee.

Jones

John

12

30

1862

Landsman

1837

CT (Bridgeport)

NH

59

Served on board the USS Rhode Island, which was engaged in saving the lives of the officers and crew of the Monitor, 30 Dec 1862. Participating in the hazardous rescue of the officers and crew of the sinking Monitor, Jones, after rescuing several of the men, became separated in a heavy gale with other members of the cutter that had set out from the Rhode Island, and spent many hours m the small boat at the mercy of the weather and high seas until finally picked up by a schooner 50 miles east of Cape Hatteras.

Jones

John E.

8

5

1864

Quartermaster

1834

NY (New York)

NY

45

Served as quartermaster on board the USS Oneida in the engagement at Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Stationed at the wheel during the fierce action, Jones, though wounded, carried out his duties gallantly by going to the poop to assist at the signals after the wheel ropes were shot away and remained there until ordered to reeve new wheel ropes.

Jones

Thomas

1

14

1865

Coxswain

1820

MD (Baltimore)

MD

59

On board the USS Ticonderoga during attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 Dec 1864; and 13 to 15 Jan 1865. Despite heavy return fire by the enemy and the explosion of the 100-pounder Parrott rifle which killed 8 men and wounded 12 more, Jones, as captain of a gun, performed his duties with skill and courage during the first 2 days of battle. As his ship again took position on the line on the 13th, he remained steadfast as the Ticonderoga maintained a well-placed fire upon the batteries on shore, and thereafter, as she materially lessened the power of guns on the mound which had been turned upon our assaulting columns. During this action the flag was planted on one side of the strongest fortifications possessed by the rebels.

Jones

William

8

5

1864

Captain of the Top

1831

PA (Philadelphia)

PA

45

As captain of a gun on board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Jones fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the prolonged battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Jordan

Robert

4

14

1863

Coxswain

1826

NY (New York)

NY

17

Attached to the USS Minnesota and temporarily serving on the USS Mount Washington, during action against the enemy in the Nansemond River, 14 April 1863. When the Mount Washington drifted against the bank following several successive hits which struck her boilers and stopped her engines, Jordan boarded the stricken vessel and, for 6 hours as fierce artillery and musketry continued to rake her decks, calmly assisted in manning a 12-pound howitzer which had been mounted on the open hurricane deck.

Jordan

Thomas

8

5

1864

Quarter-master

1840

VA (Portsmouth)

VA

59

On board the USS Galena during the attack on enemy forts at Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Securely lashed to the side of the Oneida which had suffered the loss of her steering apparatus and an explosion of her boiler from enemy fire, the Galena aided the stricken vessel past the enemy forts to safety. Despite heavy damage to his ship from raking enemy fire, Jordan performed his duties with skill and courage throughout the action.

Kane

Thomas

1

14

1865

Captain of the Hold

1841

NJ (Jersey City)

NJ

84

On board the USS Nereus during the attack on Fort Fisher, on 15 Jan 1865. Kane, as captain of the hold, displayed outstanding skill and courage as his ship maintained its well-directed fire against fortifications on shore despite the enemy's return fire. When a rebel steamer was discovered in the river back of the fort, the Nereus, with forward rifle guns trained, drove the ship off at the third fire. The gallant ship's participation contributed to the planting of the flag on one of the strongest fortifications possessed by the rebels.

Kelley

John

7

3

1862

Second Class Fireman

---

Ireland

--

11

Served as second-class fireman on board the USS Ceres in the fight near Hamilton, Roanoke River, 9 July 1862. When his ship was fired on by the enemy with small arms, Kelley returned the raking fire, courageously carrying out his duties through the engagement and was spoken of for "good conduct and cool bravery under enemy fires," by the commanding officer.

Kendrick

Thomas

8

5

1864

Coxswain

1839

ME (Bath)

ME

45

Served as coxswain on board the USS Oneida in the engagement at Mobile Bay, 5 August, 1864. Volunteering for the Mobile Bay action from Bienville, Kendrick displayed courageous devotion to duty, and his excellent conduct throughout the battle which resulted in the capture of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging of Fort Morgan, attracted the attention of the commanding officer and those serving around him.

Kenna

Barnett

8

5

1864

Quartermaster

1827

England

MA

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee, in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks from stem to stern Kenna fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious action which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Kenyon

Charles

5

5

1862

Fireman

1840

NY

NY

11

On board the USS Galena in the attack upon Drewry's Bluff, 15 May 1862. Severely burned while extricating a priming wire which had become bent and fixed in the bow gun while his ship underwent terrific shelling from the enemy, Kenyon hastily dressed his hands with cotton waste and oil and courageously returned to his gun while enemy sharpshooters in rifle pits along the banks continued to direct their fire at the men at the guns.

King

Robert H.

10

27

1864

Landsman

1845

NY

NY

45

Served on board the U.S. Picket Boat No. 1, in action, 27 Oct 1864, against the Confederate ram, Albemarle, which had res1sted repeated attacks by our steamers and had kept a large force of vessels employed in watching her. The picket boat, equipped with a spar torpedo, succeeded in passing the enemy pickets within 20 yards without being discovered and then made for the Albemarle under a full head of steam. Immediately taken under fire by the ram, the small boat plunged on, jumped the log boom which encircled the target and exploded its torpedo under the port bow of the ram. The picket boat was destroyed by enemy fire and almost the entire crew taken prisoner or lost.

Kinnaird

Samuel W.

8

5

1864

Landsman

1843

NY (New York)

NY

45

Served as a landsman on board the USS Lackawanna during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Showing a presence of mind and cheerfulness that had much to do with maintaining the crew's morale, Kinnaird served gallantly through the action which resulted in the capture of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Lafferty

John

5

25

1864

Fireman

1842

NY (New York)

PA

45

Served on board the USS Wyalusing and participated in a plan to destroy the rebel ram Albemarle in Roanoke River, 25 May 1864. Volunteering for the hazardous mission, Lafferty participated in the transfer of two torpedoes across an island swamp and then served as sentry to keep guard of clothes and arms left by other members of the party. After being rejoined by others of the party who had been discovered before the plan could be completed, Lafferty succeeded in returning to the mother ship after spending 24 hours of discomfort in the rain and swamp.

Laffey

Bartlett

3

5

1864

Seaman

1841

Ireland

MA

32

Off Yazoo City, Miss., 5 March 1864, embarking from the Marmora with a 12-pound howitzer mounted on a field carriage, Laffey landed with the gun and crew in the midst of heated battle and, bravely standing by his gun despite enemy rifle fire which cut the gun carriage and rammer, contributed to the turning back of the enemy during the fierce engagement.

Lakin

Daniel

10

3

1862

Seaman

1834

MD (Baltimore)

MD

11

On board the USS Commodore Perry in the attack upon Franklin, Va., 3 Oct 1862. With enemy fire raking the deck of his ship and blockades thwarting her progress, Lakin remained at his post and performed his duties with skill and courage as the Commodore Perry fought a gallant battle to silence many rebel batteries as she steamed down the Blackwater River.

Lann

John S.

3

6

1865

Landsman

1842

NY (Rochester)

NY

59

As landsman on board the USS Magnolia, St. Marks, Fla., 5 and 6 March, Lann served with the Army in charge of Navy howitzers during the attack on St. Marks and throughout this fierce engagement made remarkable efforts in ass1sting transport of the gun. His coolness and determination in standing by his gun while under the fire of the enemy were a credit to the service to which he belonged.

Lawson

John

8

5

1864

Landsman

1837

PA

PA

45

On board the flagship USS Hartford during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864. Wounded in the leg and thrown violently against the side of the ship when an enemy shell killed or wounded the 6-man crew as the shell whipped on the berth deck, Lawson, upon regaining his composure, promptly returned to his station and, although urged to go below for treatment, steadfastly continued his duties throughout the remainder of the action.

Lear

Nicholas

1

14

1865

Quartermaster

1826

RI

PA

59

Lear served on board the USS New Ironsides during action in several attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 Dec 1864; and 13, 14, and 15 Jan 1865. The ship steamed in and took the lead in the ironclad division close inshore and immediately opened its starboard battery in a barrage of well-directed fire to cause several fires and explosions and dismount several guns during the first two days of fighting. Taken under fire as she steamed into position on 13 Jan, the New Ironsides fought all day and took on ammunition at night despite severe weather conditions. When the enemy came out of his bombproofs to defend the fort against the storming party, the ship's battery disabled nearly every gun on the fort facing the shore before the cease-fire order was given by the flagship.

Lee

James H.

6

19

1864

Seaman

1840

NY

NY

45

as seaman on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Acting as sponger of the No. 1 gun during this bitter engagement, Lee exhibited marked coolness and good conduct and was highly recommended for his gallantry under fire by the divisional officer.

Leland

George W.

11

16

1863

Gunner's Mate

1834

GA (Savannah)

GA

32

Serving on board the USS Lehigh, Charleston Harbor, 16 November 1863, during the hazardous task, of freeing the Lehigh, which had grounded, and was under heavy enemy fire from Fort Moultrie. Rowing the small boat which was used in the hazardous task of transferring hawsers from the Lehigh to the Nahant, Leland twice succeeded in making the trip, only to find that each had been in vain when the hawsers were cut by enemy fire and chaffing.

Leon

Pierre

12

23

1862

Captain of the Forecastle

1837

LA (New Orleans)

PA

11

Serving on board the USS Baron De Kalb, Yazoo River Expedition, 23 to 27 Dec 1862. Proceeding under orders up the Yazoo River, the USS Baron De Kalb, with the object of capturing or destroying the enemy's transports, came upon the steamers John Walsh, R. J. Locklan, Golden Age and the Scotland sunk on a bar where they were ordered fired. Continuing up the river, she was fired on, but upon returning the fire, caused the enemy's retreat. Returning down the Yazoo, she destroyed and captured larger quantities of enemy equipment and several prisoners. Serving bravely throughout this action, Leon, as captain of the forecastle, "d1stinguished himself in the various actions."

Lloyd

Benjamin

5

25

1864

Coal Heaver

1839

England

PA

45

Serving on board the USS Wyalusing and participating in a plan to destroy the rebel ram Albemarle in Roanoke River, 25 May 1864. Volunteering for the hazardous mission, Lloyd participated in the transfer of two torpedoes across an island swamp. Serving as boat keeper, he aided in rescuing others of the party who had been detected before the plan could be completed, but who escaped, leaving detection of the plan impossible. By his skill and courage, Lloyd succeeded in returning to the mother ship after spending 24 hours of discomfort in the rain and swamp.

Lloyd

John W.

5

25

1864

Coxswain

1831

NY (New York)

NY

45

Serving on board the USS Wyalusing during an attempt to destroy the rebel ram Albemarle in Roanoke River, 25 May 1864, Lloyd participated in this daring plan by swimming the Roanoke River heavily weighted with a line which was used for hauling torpedoes across. Thwarted by discovery just before the completion of the plan, Lloyd cut the torpedo guiding line to prevent detection of the plan by the enemy and again swam the river, narrowly escaping enemy musket fire and regaining the ship in safety.

Logan *

Hugh

12

30

1862

Captain of the Afterguard

1834

Ireland

MA

59

On board the USS Rhode Island which was engaged in rescuing men from the stricken Monitor, on 30 Dec 1862. After the Monitor sprang a leak and went down, Logan courageously risked his life in a gallant attempt to rescue members of the crew. Although sacrificing his life during the hazardous operation, he had made every effort possible to save the lives of his fellow men.

Lyons

Thomas

4

24

1862

Seaman

1838

MA (Salem)

MA

169

Served as seaman on board the USS Pensacola in the attack on Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 24 April 1862. Carrying out his duties throughout the din and roar of the battle, Lyons never once erred in his brave performance. Lashed outside of that vessel, on the port-sheet chain, with the lead in hand to lead the ship past the forts, Lyons never flinched, although under a heavy fire from the forts and rebel gunboats. 

Machon

James

8

5

1864

Boy

1848

England

NY

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. Stationed in the immediate vicinity of the shell whips which were twice cleared of men by bursting shells, Machon remained steadfast at his post and performed his duties in the powder division throughout the furious action which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Mack

Alexander

8

5

1864

Captain of the Top

1836

Netherlands

NY

45

board the USS Brooklyn during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. Although wounded and sent below for treatment, Mack immediately returned to his post and took charge of his gun and, as heavy enemy return fire continued to fall, performed his duties with skill and courage until he was again wounded and totally disabled.

Mack

John

4

6

1865

Seaman

1843

ME

ME

59

As seaman on board the USS Hendrick Hudson, St. Marks, Fla., 5 and 6 March 1865, Mack served with the Army in charge of Navy howitzers during the attack on St. Marks and, throughout this fierce engagement, made remarkable efforts in assisting transport of the gun. His coolness and determination in courageously standing by his gun while under the fire of the enemy were a credit to the service to which he belonged.

Mackie

John F.

5

15

1862

Corporal, USMC

1836

NY (New York)

NY

17

On board the USS Galena in the attack on Fort Darling at Drewry's Bluff, James River, on 15 May 1862. As enemy shellfire raked the deck of his ship, Corporal Mackie fearlessly maintained his musket fire against the rifle pits along the shore and, when ordered to fill vacancies at guns caused by men wounded and killed in action, manned the weapon with skill and courage.

Madden

William

8

5

1864

Coal Heaver

1843

England

NY

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during the successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. Stationed in the immediate vicinity of the shell whips, which were twice cleared of men by bursting shells, Madden remained steadfast at his post and performed his duties in the powder division throughout the furious action which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Martin

Edward S.

8

5

1864

Quarter-master

1840

Ireland

PA

59

On board the USS Galena during the attack on enemy forts at Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Securely lashed to the side of the Oneida which had suffered the loss of her steering apparatus and an explosion of her boiler from enemy fire, the Galena aided the stricken vessel past the enemy forts to safety. Despite heavy damage to his ship from raking enemy fire, Martin performed his duties with skill and courage throughout the action.

Martin

James

8

5

1864

Sergeant, USMC

1826

Ireland (Derry)

PA

45

As captain of a gun on board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Sgt. Martin fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious 2_hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Martin

William

12

27

1862

Boatswain's Mate

1842

Prussia

--

11

(Entered service at St. Louis, Mo.) Serving as boatswain's mate on board the USS Benton during the attack on Haines Bluff, Yazoo River, 27 Dec 1862. Taking part in the hour-and-a-half engagement with the enemy, who had the dead range of the vessel and was punishing her with heavy fire, Martin served courageously throughout the battle until the Benton was ordered to withdraw.

Martin

William

4

24

1862

Seaman

1839

Ireland

NY

11

Captain of a gun on board the USS Varuna during an attack on Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 24 April 1862. His ship was taken under furious fire by the rebel Morgan and severely damaged by ramming. Steadfast at his station through the thickest of the fight, Martin inflicted damage on the enemy, remaining cool and courageous although the Varuna, so badly damaged that she was forced to beach, was finally sunk.

McClelland

Matthew

3

14

1863

First Class Fireman

1833

NY (Brooklyn)

NY

17

Serving on board the USS Richmond in the attack on Port Hudson, 14 March 1863. Damaged by a 6_inch solid rifle shot which shattered the starboard safety-valve chamber and also damaged the port safety-valve, the fireroom of the Richmond immediately became filled with steam to place it in an extremely critical condition. Acting courageously in this crisis, McClelland persisted in penetrating the steam-filled room in order to haul the hot fires of the furnaces and continued this gallant action until the gravity of the situation had lessened.

McCormick

Michael

5

5

1864

Boatswain's Mate,

1833

Ireland

IL

45

Served as boatswain's mate on board the USS Signal, Red River, 5 May 1864. Proceeding up the Red River, the USS Signal engaged a large force of enemy field batteries and sharpshooters, returning the fire until the ship was totally disabled, at which time the white flag was raised. Serving as gun captain and wounded early in the battle, McCormick bravely stood by his gun in the face of the enemy fire until ordered to withdraw.

McCullock

Adam

8

5

1864

Seaman

1830

ME

ME

45

On board the USS Lackawanna during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. Wounded when an enemy shell struck, and ordered to go below, McCullock refused to leave his station and continued to perform his duties throughout the prolonged action which resulted in the capture of the prize ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of Fort Morgan.

McDonald

John

12

27

1862

Boatswain's Mate

1817

Scotland

MA

11

Serving on board the USS Baron De Kalb, Yazoo River Expedition, 23 to 27 Dec 1862. Proceeding under orders up the Yazoo River, the USS Baron De Kalb, with the object of capturing or destroying the enemy's transports, came upon the steamers John Walsh, R. J. Locklan, Golden Age, and the Scotland, sunk on a bar where they were ordered burned. Continuing up the river, she was fired on but, upon returning the fire, caused the enemy's retreat. Returning down the Yazoo, she destroyed and captured large quantities of enemy equipment and several prisoners. Serving bravely throughout this action, McDonald, as boatswain's mate, "distinguished himself in the various actions."

McFarland

John

8

5

1864

Captain of the Forecastle

1840

MA (Boston)

MA

45

Stationed at the wheel on board the flagship USS Hartford during successful action against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. With his ship under terrific enemy shellfire, McFarland performed his duties with skill and courage and, when the Lackawanna ran into his ship and every man at the wheel was in danger of being crushed, remained steadfast at his station and continued to steer the ship.

McGowan

John

4

24

1862

Quartermaster

1831

Ireland

NY

11

McGowan occupied one of the most responsible positions on the USS Varuna during the attacks on Forts Jackson and St. Philip and in action against the rebel ship Morgan on 24 April 1862. Although guns were raking the decks from behind him, McGowan remained steadfast at the wheel throughout the thickest of the fight, continuing at his station and rendering service with the greatest courage and skill until his ship, repeatedly holed and twice rammed by the enemy, was beached and sunk.

McHugh

Martin

5

27

1863

Seaman

1837

OH (Cincinnati)

OH

17

Served on board the USS Cincinnati during the attack on the Vicksburg batteries and at the time of her sinking, 27 May 1863. Engaging the enemy in a fierce battle, the Cincinnati amidst, an incessant fire of shot and shell, continued to fire her guns to the last, though so penetrated by shellfire that her fate was sealed. Serving bravely during this action, McHugh was conspicuously cool under the fire of the enemy, never ceasing to fire until this proud ship went down, "her colors nailed to the mast."

McIntosh

James

8

5

1864

Captain of the Top

1833

Canada

NY

45

On board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, McIntosh performed his duties with skill and courage throughout the prolonged battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the successful attacks carried out on Fort Morgan.

McKnight

William

4

24

1862

Coxswain

1840

NY (Ulster County)

NY

11

Captain of a gun on board the USS Varuna during the attacks on Forts Jackson and St. Philip and in action against the rebel ship Morgan, 24 April 1862. During this action at extremely close range, while his ship was under furious fire and was twice rammed by the rebel ship Morgan, McKnight remained steadfast at his gun throughout the thickest of the fight and was instrumental in inflicting damage on the enemy until the Varuna, so badly damaged that she was forced to beach, was finally sunk.

McLeod

James

4

24

1862

Captain of the Foretop

---

Scotland

ME

11

Captain of foretop, and a volunteer from the Colorado, McLeod served on board the USS Pensacola during the attack upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip and the taking of New Orleans, 24 and 25 April 1862. Acting as gun captain of the rifled howitzer aft which was much exposed, he served this piece with great ability and activity, although no officer superintended it.

McWilliams

George W

1

14

1865

Landsman

1844

PA

PA

59

Served on board the USS Pontoosuc during the capture of Fort Fisher and Wilmington, 24 Dec 1864, to 22 February 1865. Carrying out his duties faithfully throughout this period, McWilliams was so severely wounded in the assault upon Fort Fisher that he was sent to the hospital at Portsmouth, Va. McWilliams was recommended for his gallantry, skill and coolness in action while under the fire of the enemy.

Melville

Charles

8

5

1864

Ordinary Seaman

1828

NH (Dover)

NH

45

On board the flagship USS Hartford during action against rebel gunboats, the ram Tennessee, and Fort Morgan in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Wounded and taken below to the surgeon when a shell burst between the two forward 9_inch guns, killing and wounding 15 men, Melville promptly returned to his gun on the deck and, although scarcely able to stand, refused to go below and continued to man his post throughout the remainder of the action resulting in the capture of the rebel ram Tennessee.

Mifflin

James

8

5

1864

Engineer's Cook

1839

VA (Richmond)

VA

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. Stationed in the immediate vicinity of the shell whips which were twice cleared of men by bursting shells, Mifflin remained steadfast at his post and performed his duties in the powder division throughout the furious action which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Miller

Andrew

8

5

1864

Sergeant, USMC

1836

Germany

DC

45

As captain of a gun on board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Sgt. Miller fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious 2_hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Miller

James

12

25

1863

Quartermaster

1835

Denmark

MA

32

Served as quartermaster on board the U.S. Steam Gunboat Marblehead off Legareville, Stono River, 25 Dec 1863, during an engagement with the enemy on John's Island. Acting courageously under the fierce hostile fire, Miller behaved gallantly throughout the engagement which resulted in the enemy's withdrawal and abandonment of its arms.

Milliken

Daniel

1

14

1865

Quarter Gunner

1838

ME

NY

59

Milliken served on board the USS New Ironsides during action in several attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 Dec 1864_ and 13,14 and 15 Jan 1865. The ship steamed in and took the lead in the Ironclad division close inshore and immediately opened its starboard battery in a barrage of well directed fire to cause several fires and explosions and dismount several guns during the first 2 days of fighting. Taken under fire as she steamed into position on 13 Jan, the New Ironsides fought all day and took on ammunition at night despite severe weather conditions. When the enemy came out of his bombproofs to defend the fort against the storming party, the ship's battery disabled nearly every gun on the fort facing the shore before the cease-fire orders were given by the flagship.

Mills

Charles

1

14

1865

Seaman

1843

NY (Ulster)

NY

59

On board the USS Minnesota, in action during the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 Jan 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, Mills charged up to the palisades and, when more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, risked his life to remain with a wounded officer. With the enemy concentrating his fire on the group, he waited until after dark before assisting the wounded man from the field.

Molloy

Hugh

3

2

1864

Ordinary Seaman

1832

IL

IL

32

Served on board the USS Fort Hindman during the engagement near Harrisonburg, La., 2 March 1864. Following a shell burst which mortally wounded the first sponger, who dropped the sponge out of the forecastle port, Molloy jumped out of the port to the forecastle, recovered the sponge and sponged and loaded the gun for the remainder of the action from his exposed position, despite the extreme danger to his person from the raking fire of enemy musketry.

Montgomery

Robert

12

23

1864

Captain of the Afterguard

1838

Ireland

VA

45

Montgomery served on board the USS Agawam, as one of a volunteer crew of a powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher, 23 Dec 1864. The powder boat, towed in by the Wilderness to prevent detection by the enemy, cast off and slowly steamed to within 300 yards of the beach. After fuses and fires had been lit and a second anchor with short scope let go to assure the boat's tailing inshore, the crew again boarded the Wilderness and proceeded a distance of 12 miles from shore. Less than 2 hours later the explosion took place, and the following day fires were observed still burning at the forts.

Moore

Charles

12

25

1863

Landsman

1839

Ireland

NY

32

Serving on board the U.S. Steam Gunboat Marblehead off Legareville, Stono River, 25 Dec 1863, during an engagement with the enemy on John's Island. Wounded in the fierce battle, Moore returned to his quarters until so exhausted by loss of blood that he had to be taken below. This engagement resulted in the enemy's abandonment of his positions, leaving a caisson and one gun behind.

Moore

Charles

6

19

1864

Seaman

---

---

--

45

(Entered service 25 March 1862, at Gibraltar, England.) Served as seaman on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Acting as sponger and loader of the 11-inch pivot gun of the second division during this bitter engagement, Moore exhibited marked coolness and good conduct and was highly recommended for his gallantry under fire by the divisional officer.

Moore

George

12

30

1862

Seaman

1838

PA (Philadelphia)

PA

59

Served on board the USS Rhode Island which was engaged in saving the lives of the officers and crew of the Monitor, 30 Dec 1862. Participating in the hazardous task of rescuing the officers and crew of the sinking Monitor, Moore after rescuing several of the men, became separated in a heavy gale with other members of the cutter that had set out from the Rhode Island, and spent many hours in the small boat at the mercy of the weather and high seas until finally picked up by a schooner 50 miles east of Cape Hatteras.

Moore

William

12

27

1862

Boatswain's Mate

1834

MA (Boston)

MA

32

Serving as boatswain's mate on board the USS Benton during the attack on Haines Bluff, Yazoo River, 27 Dec 1862. Wounded during the hour-and-a-half engagement in which the enemy had the dead range of the vessel and was punishing her with heavy fire, Moore served courageously in carrying lines to the shore until the Benton was ordered to withdraw.

Morgan

James H.

9

5

1864

Captain of the Top

1840

NY

NY

45

As captain of a gun on board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks Morgan fought his gun with skill and courage throughout a furious 2_hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Morrison

John G.

7

15

1862

Coxswain

1842

Ireland

--

59

(Entered service at Lansingburg, N.Y.) as coxswain on board the USS Carondelet, Morrison was commended for meritorious conduct in general and especially for his heroic conduct and his inspiring example to the crew in the engagement with the rebel ram Arkansas, Yazoo River, 15 July 1862. When the Carondelet was badly cut up, several of her crew killed, many wounded and others almost suffocated from the effects of escaped steam, Morrison was the leader when boarders were called on deck, and the first to return to the guns and give the ram a broadside as she passed. His presence of mind in time of battle or trial is reported as always conspicuous and encouraging.

Morton

Charles W.

12

27

1863

Boatswain's Mate

1836

Ireland

MD

11

Serving as boatswain's mate on board the USS Benton during the Yazoo River Expedition, 23 to 27 Dec 1863. Taking part in the hour-and-a-half engagement with the enemy at Drumgould's Bluff, 27 Dec, Morton served courageously throughout the battle against the hostile forces, who had the dead range of the vessel and were punishing her with heavy fire, until the Benton was ordered to withdraw.

Mullen

Patrick

7

17

1865

Boatswain's Mate

---

MD (Baltimore)

--

59

(Entered service at Baltimore, Md.) Served as boatswain's mate on board the USS Wyandank during a boat expedition up Mattox Creek, 17 March 1865. Rendering gallant assistance to his commanding officer, Mullen, lying on his back, loaded the howitzer and then fired so carefully as to kill and wound many rebels, causing their retreat.

Mullen

Patrick

5

1

1865

Boatswain's Mate

---

MD (Baltimore)

--

62

Second award. Served as boatswain's mate on board the USS Don, 1 May 1865. Engaged in picking up the crew of Picket Launch No. 6, which had swamped. Mullen, seeing an officer who was at that time no longer able to keep up and was below the surface of the water, jumped overboard and brought the officer to the boat, thereby rescuing him from drowning, which brave action entitled him to wear a bar on the medal he had already received at Mattox Creek, 17 March 1865.

Murphy

Patrick

8

5

1864

Boatswain's Mate

1823

Ireland

NY

 

Served as boatswain's mate on board the USS Metacomet, during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Murphy performed his duties with skill and courage throughout a furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Naylor

David

8

5

1864

Landsman

1843

NY (Thompsonville)

NY

45

Served on board the USS Oneida in the engagement at Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Acting as powder boy at the 30-pounder Parrott rifle, Naylor had his passing box shot from his hands and knocked overboard where it fell in one of the Galena's boats which was under the bow. Jumping overboard, Naylor recovered his box, returned to his station and continued to carry out his courageous actions throughout the engagement which resulted in the capture of the rebel ram Tennessee and the damaging of Fort Morgan.

Neil

John

12

23

1864

Quarter Gunner

1837

Newfoundland

VA

45

Neil served on board the USS Agawam, as one of a volunteer crew of a powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher, 23 Dec 1864. The powder boat, towed in by the Wilderness to prevent detection by the enemy, cast off and slowly steamed to within 300 yards of the beach. After fuses and fires had been lit and a second anchor with short scope let go to assure the boat's tailing inshore, the crew again boarded the Wilderness and proceeded a distance of 12 miles from shore. Less than 2 hours later the explosion took place, and the following day fires were observed still burning at the forts.

Newland

William

8

5

1864

Ordinary Seaman

1841

MA (Medway)

MA

45

Serving on board the USS Oneida in the engagement at Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Carrying out his duties as loader of the after 11-inch gun, Newland distinguished himself on board for his good conduct and faithful discharge of his station, behaving splendidly under the fire of the enemy and throughout the battle which resulted in the capture of the rebel ram Tennessee and the damaging of Fort Morgan.

Nibbe

John H.

4

22

1864

Quartermaster

1842

Germany

NY

59

Served as quartermaster on board the USS Petrel during its capture in Yazoo River, 22 April 1864. Standing his ground when a shot came through the stern, raking the gun deck and entering and exploding the boilers, when all the others had deserted the flag, Nibbe assisted in getting the wounded off the guard and proceeded to get ready to fire the ship despite the escaping steam from the boilers at which time he was surrounded on all sides by the rebels and forced to surrender.

Nichols

William

8

5

1864

Quartermaster

1837

NY (New York)

NY

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee, in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks from stem to stern, Nichols fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee, and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Noble

Daniel

8

5

1864

Landsman

1840

KY (Bath County)

--

71

As landsman on board the USS Metacomet, Noble served among the boat's crew which went to the rescue of the U.S. Monitor Tecumseh when that vessel was struck by a torpedo in passing enemy forts in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Noble braved the enemy fire which was said by the admiral to be "one of the most galling" he had ever seen and aided in rescuing from death 10 of the crew of the Tecumseh, thereby eliciting the admiration of both friend and foe.

Nugent

Christopher

6

15

1863

Orderly Sergeant, USMC

1840

Ireland (County Caven)

MA

32

Serving on board the USS Fort Henry, Crystal River, Fla., 15 June 1863. Reconnoitering on the Crystal River on this date and in charge of a boat from the Fort Henry, Orderly Sgt. Nugent ordered an assault upon a rebel breastwork fortification. In this assault, the orderly sergeant and his comrades drove a guard of 11 rebels into the swamp, capturing their arms and destroying their camp equipage while gallantly withholding fire to prevent harm to a woman among the fugitives. On 30 July 1863, he further proved his courage by capturing a boat off Depot Key, Fla., containing 2 men and a woman with their baggage.

O’Brien

Oliver

11

28

1864

Coxswain

1839

MA (Boston)

MA

45

Served as coxswain on board the U.S. Sloop John Adams, Sullivan's Island Channel, 28 November 1864. Taking part in the boarding of the blockade runner Beatrice while under heavy enemy fire from Fort Moultrie, O'Brien, who was in charge of one of the boarding launches, carried out his duties with prompt and energetic conduct. This action resulted in the firing of the Beatrice and the capture of a quantity of supplies from her.

O’Connell

Thomas

8

5

1864

Coal Heaver

1842

Ireland

NY

45

On board the flagship USS Hartford, during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864. Although a patient in the sick bay, O'Connell voluntarily reported at his station at the shell whip and continued to perform his duties with zeal and courage until his right hand was severed by an enemy shell burst.

O'Donoghue

Timothy

5

5

1864

Seaman

1841

NY (Rochester)

NY

45

Served as boatswain's mate on board the USS Signal, Red River, 5 May 1864. Proceeding up the Red River, the USS Signal engaged a large force of enemy field batteries and sharpshooters, returning the fire until the ship was totally disabled, at which time the white flag was raised. Serving as gun captain, and wounded early in the battle, O'Donoghue bravely stood by his gun in the face of enemy fire until ordered to withdraw.

Ortega

John

--

--

1864

Seaman

1840

Spain

PA

45

Served as seaman on board the USS Saratoga during actions of that vessel on 2 occasions. Carrying out his duties courageously during these actions, Ortega conducted himself gallantly through both periods. Promoted to acting master's mate.

Oviatt

Miles M.

8

5

1864

Corporal, USMC

1841

NY (Cattaraugus County)

NY

45

board the USS Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked the deck, Cpl. Oviatt fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious 2_hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee.

Parker

William

4

24

1862

Captain of the Afterguard

---

MA (Boston)

MA

11

At the wheel on board the USS Cayuga during the capture of Forts St. Philip and Jackson, and New Orleans, 24 and 25 April 1862. As his ship led the advance column toward the barrier and both forts opened fire simultaneously, striking the vessel from stem to stern, Parker conscientiously performed his duties throughout the action in which attempts by 3 rebel steamers to butt and board were thwarted, and the ships driven off. Eleven gunboats were successfully engaged and the enemy garrisons forced to surrender during this battle in which the Cayuga sustained 46 hits.

Parks

George

8

5

1864

Captain of the Forecastle

1823

NY (Schenectady)

NY

45

On board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Parks performed his duties with skill and courage throughout a furious 2_hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Pease

Joachim

6

19

1864

Seaman

---

NY (Long Island)

NY

45

Served as seaman on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Acting as loader on the No. 2 gun during this bitter engagement, Pease exhibited marked coolness and good conduct and was highly recommended by the divisional officer for gallantry under fire.

Peck

Oscar E.

4

24

1862

Second Class Boy

1848

CT (Bridgeport)

CT

11

Peck served as second-class boy on board the Varuna during an attack on Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 24 April 1862. Acting as powder boy of the after rifle, Peck served gallantly while the Varuna was repeatedly attacked and rammed and finally sunk. This was an extremely close-range action and, although badly damaged, the Varuna delivered shells abaft the Morgan's armor.

Pelham

William

8

5

1864

Landsman

---

Nova Scotia (Halifax)

--

45

(Enlisted in Nova Scotia.) On board the flagship USS Hartford during successful actions against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. When the other members of his gun crew were killed or wounded under the enemy's terrific shellfire, Pelham calmly assisted the casualties below and voluntarily returned and took his place at an adjoining gun where another man had been struck down. He continued to fight his gun throughout the remainder of the battle which resulted in the capture of the Tennessee.

Perry

Thomas

6

19

1864

Boatswain's Mate

1836

NY

NY

45

Served as boatswain's mate on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Acting as captain of the No. 2 gun during this bitter engagement, Perry exhibited marked coolness and good conduct under the enemy fire and was recommended for gallantry by his divisional officer.

Peterson

Alfred

10

3

1862

Seaman

1838

Sweden

NY

11

On board the USS Commodore Perry in the attack upon Franklin, Va., 3 Oct 1862. With enemy fire raking the deck of his ship and blockades thwarting her progress, Peterson remained at his post and performed his duties with skill and courage as the Commodore Perry fought a gallant battle to silence many rebel batteries as she steamed down the Blackwater River.

Phinney

William

8

5

1864

Boatswain's Mate

1824

Norway

NY

45

On board the USS Lackawanna during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram, Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Serving as a gun captain Phinney showed much presence of mind in managing the gun, and gave much needed encouragement to the crew during the engagement which resulted in the capture of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of Fort Morgan.

Poole

William B.

6

19

1864

Quarter-master

1833

ME

ME

45

Service as quartermaster on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Stationed at the helm, Poole steered the ship during the engagement in a cool and most creditable manner and was highly commended by his divisional officer for his gallantry under fire.

Prance

George

1

14

1865

Captain of the Main Top

1827

France

MA

59

On board the USS Ticonderoga during attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 Dec 1864; and 13 to 15 Jan 1865. Despite heavy return fire by the enemy and the explosion of the 100-pounder Parrott rifle which killed 8 men and wounded 12 more, Prance as captain of a gun, performed his duties with skill and courage during the first 2 days of battle. As his ship again took position on the line on the 13th, he remained steadfast as the Ticonderoga maintained a well-placed fire upon the batteries on shore, and thereafter as she materially lessened the power of guns on the mound which had been turned upon our assaulting columns. During this action the flag was planted on one of the strongest fortifications possessed by the rebels.

Preston

John

8

5

1864

Landsman

1841

Ireland

MA

45

Served on board the USS Oneida in the engagement at Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Severely wounded, Preston remained at his gun throughout the engagement which resulted in the capture of the rebel ram Tennessee and the damaging of Fort Morgan, carrying on until obliged to go to the surgeon to whom he reported himself as "only slightly injured." He then assisted in taking care of the wounded below and wanted to be allowed to return to his battle station on deck. Upon close examination it was found that he was wounded quite severely in both eyes.

Price

Edward

8

5

1864

Coxswain

1840

NY

NY

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. When the sponge broke, leaving the head in the gun, and completely disabling the weapon, Price immediately cleared it by pouring powder into the vent and blowing the sponge head out, thereafter continuing to man the weapon until the close of the furious action which resulted in the capture of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the infliction of damage and destruction on Fort Morgan.

Province

George

1

14

1865

Ordinary Seaman

1842

NY (New York)

NY

59

On board the USS Santiago de Cuba during the assault on Fort Fisher on 15 Jan 1865. As one of a boat crew detailed to one of the generals on shore, Province bravely entered the fort in the assault and accompanied his party in carrying dispatches at the height of the battle. He was one of six men who entered the fort in the assault from the fleet.

Pyne

George

3

6

1865

Seaman

1841

England

NY

59

As seaman on board the USS Magnolia, St. Marks, Fla., 5 and 6 March 1865. Serving with the Army in charge of Navy howitzers during the attack on St. Marks and throughout this fierce engagement, Pyne, although wounded, made remarkable efforts in assisting transport of the gun, and his coolness and determination in courageously standing by his gun while under the fire of the enemy were a credit to the service to which he belonged.

Rannahan

John

1

14

1865

Corporal, USMC

1836

Ireland (County of Monahan)

PA

59

On board the USS Minnesota in the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 Jan 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, Cpl. Rannahan advanced to the top of the sand hill and partly through the breach in the palisades despite enemy fire which killed or wounded many officers and men. When more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, he remained with the party until dark when it came safely away, bringing its wounded, its arms and its colors.

Read

Charles

3

6

1865

Ordinary Seaman

1840

NY (Cambridge)

NY

59

As seaman on board the USS Magnolia, St. Marks, Fla., 5 and 6 March 1865. Serving with the Army in charge of Navy howitzers during the attack on St. Marks and throughout this fierce engagement, Read made remarkable efforts in assisting transport of the gun, and his coolness and determination in courageously standing by his gun while under the fire of the enemy were a credit to the service to which he belonged.

Read

Charles A.

6

19

1864

Coxswain

1837

Sweden

OH

45

Served as coxswain on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Acting as the first sponger of the pivot gun during this bitter engagement, Read exhibited marked coolness and good conduct and was highly recommended for his gallantry under fire by his divisional officer.

Read

George E.

6

19

1864

Seaman

1838

RI

RI

45

Served as seaman on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Acting as the first loader of the No. 2 gun during this bitter engagement, Read exhibited marked coolness and good conduct and was highly recommended for his gallantry under fire by his divisional officer.

Regan

Jeremiah

5

15

1862

Quartermaster

1832

MA (Boston)

MA

11

As captain of No. 2 gun on board the USS Galena in the attack upon Drewry's Bluff, 15 May 1862. With his ship severely damaged by the enemy's shellfire and several men killed and wounded Regan, continued to man his gun throughout the engagement despite the concentration of fire directed against men at their guns by enemy sharpshooters in rifle pits along the banks.

Rice

Charles

12

23

1864

Coal Heaver

1840

Russia

ME

45

On board the USS Agawam, as one of a volunteer crew of a powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher, 23 Dec 1864. The powder boat, towed in by the Wilderness to prevent detection by the enemy, cast off and slowly steamed to within 300 yards of the beach. After fuses and fires had been lit and a second anchor with short scope let go to assure the boat's tailing inshore, the crew again boarded the Wilderness and proceeded a distance of 12 miles from shore. Less than 2 hours later the explosion took place, and the following day, fires were observed still burning at the fort.

Richards

Louis

4

24

1862

Quartermaster

1835

NY (New York)

NY

11

Richards served as quartermaster on board the USS Pensacola in the attack upon Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and at the taking of New Orleans, 24 and 25 April 1862. Through all the din and roar of battle, he steered the ship through the narrow opening of the barricade, and his attention to orders contributed to the successful passage of the ship without once fouling the shore or the obstacles of the barricade.

Ringold

Edward

10

22

1862

Coxswain

1827

MD (Baltimore)

MD

17

Served as coxswain on board the USS Wabash in the engagement at Pocataligo, 22 Oct 1862. Soliciting permission to accompany the howitzer corps, and performing his duty with such gallantry and presence of mind as to attract the attention of all around him, Ringold, knowing there was a scarcity of ammunition, went through the whole line of fire with his shirt slung over his shoulder filled with fixed ammunition which he had brought from two miles to the rear of the lines.

Roantree

James S.

8

5

1864

Sergeant, USMC

1835

Ireland (Dublin)

NY

45

On board the USS Oneida during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks and penetrated her boilers, Sgt. Roantree performed his duties with skill and courage throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Roberts

James

12

23

1864

Seaman

1837

England

VA

45

Roberts served on board the USS Agawam, as one of a volunteer crew of a powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher, 23 Dec 1864. The powder boat, towed in by the Wilderness to prevent detection by the enemy, cast off and slowly steamed to within 300 yards of the beach. After fuses and fires had been lit and a second anchor with short scope let go to assure the boat's tailing inshore, the crew again boarded the Wilderness and proceeded a distance of 12 miles from shore. Less than 2 hours later the explosion took place and the following day fires were observed still burning at the fort.

Robinson

Alexander

9

25

1864

Boatswain's Mate

1831

England

NY

45

Served as boatswain's mate on board the USS Howquah on the occasion of the destruction of the blockade runner, Lynx, off Wilmington, 25 September 1864. Performing his duty faithfully under the most trying circumstances, Robinson stood firmly at his post in the midst of a crossfire from the rebel shore batteries and our own vessels.

Robinson

Charles

12

27

1862

Boatswain's Mate

1832

Scotland

NY

11

Serving on board the USS Baron de Kalb, Yazoo River Expedition, 23 to 27 Dec 1862. Proceeding under orders up the Yazoo River, the USS Baron de Kalb, with the object of capturing or destroying the enemy's transports, came upon the steamers John Walsh, R. J. Locklan, Golden Age, and the Scotland sunk on a bar where they were ordered fired. Continuing up the river, she was fired on by the enemy, but upon returning the fire, caused the rebels to retreat. Returning down the Yazoo, she destroyed and captured large quantities of enemy equipment and several prisoners. Serving bravely throughout this action, Robinson, as boatswain's mate, "d1stinguished himself in the various actions."

Rountry

John

9

21

1864

First Class Fireman

1840

MA

MA

59

Served as first class fireman on board the USS Montauk, 21 September 1864. During the night of 21 September when fire was discovered in the magazine lightroom of that vessel, causing a panic and demoralizing the crew, Rountry, notwithstanding the cry of "fire in the magazine," forced his way with hose in hand, through the frightened crowd to the lightroom and put out the flames.

Rush

John

3

14

1863

First Class Fireman

1835

DC (Washington)

DC

17

Serving on board the USS Richmond in the attack on Port Hudson, 14 March 1863. Damaged by a 6-inch solid rifle shot which shattered the starboard safety-valve chamber and also damaged the port safety valve, the fireroom of the Richmond immediately became filled with steam to place it in an extremely critical condition. Acting courageously in this crisis, Rush persisted in penetrating the steam-filled room in order to haul the hot fires of the furnaces, and continued this action until the gravity of the situation had been lessened.

Sanderson

Aaron

3

17

1865

Landsman

---

NC

--

59

(Entered service at Philadelphia, Pa.) Served on board the USS Wyandank during a boat expedition up Mattox Creek, 17 March 1865. Participating with a boat crew in the clearing of Mattox Creek, L/man Anderson carried out his duties courageously in the face of a devastating fire which cut away half the oars, pierced the launch in many places and cut the barrel off a musket being fired at the enemy.

Saunders

James

6

19

1864

Quartermaster

1809

MA

MA

59

Served as quartermaster on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Carrying out his duties courageously throughout the bitter engagement, Saunders was prompt in reporting damages done to both ships, and it is testified to by Commodore Winslow that he is deserving of all commendation, both for gallantry and for encouragement of others in his division.

Savage

Auzella

1

14

1865

Ordinary Seaman

1846

ME

MA

59

On board the USS Santiago de Cuba in the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 Jan 1865. When the landing party to which he was attached charged on the fort with a cheer, and the determination to plant the colors on the ramparts, Savage remained steadfast when more than two-thirds of the marines and sailors fell back in panic during the fight. When enemy fire shot away the flagstaff above his hand, he bravely seized the remainder of the staff and brought his colors safely off.

Schutt

George

3

6

1865

Coxswain

1833

Ireland

NY

59

As coxswain on board the USS Hendrick Hudson, St. Marks, Fla., 5 and 6 March 1865. Serving with the army in charge of Navy howitzers during the attack on St. Marks and throughout the fierce engagement, Schutt made remarkable efforts in assisting transport of the gun, and his coolness and determination in courageously remaining by his gun while under the heavy fire of the enemy were a credit to the service to which he belonged.

Seanor

James

8

5

1864

Master-at-Arms

1833

MA (Boston)

NY

45

Served as master-at-arms on board the U.S. Ironclad Chickasaw, Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Although his enlistment was up, Seanor volunteered for the battle of Mobile Bay, going on board the Chickasaw from the Vincennes where he carried out his duties gallantly throughout the engagement which resulted in the capture of the rebel ram Tennessee.

Seward

Richard E.

11

23

1863

Paymaster's Steward

---

ME (Kittery)

--

--

Served as paymaster's steward on board the USS Commodore, November 1863. Carrying out his duties courageously, Seward "volunteered to go on the field amidst a heavy fire to recover the bodies of 2 soldiers which he brought off with the aid of others; a second instance of personal valor within a fortnight.'' Promoted to acting master's mate.

Sharp

Hendrick

8

5

1864

Seaman

1815

Spain

NY

45

As captain of a 100-pounder rifle gun on topgallant forecastle on board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Sharp fought his gun with skill and courage throughout a furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of the batteries at Fort Morgan.

Shepard

Louis C.

1

14

1865

Ordinary Seaman

1843

OH

OH

59

Served as seaman on board the USS Wabash in the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 Jan 1865. Advancing gallantly through severe enemy fire while armed only with a revolver and cutlass which made it impossible to return the fire at that range, Shepard succeeded in reaching the angle of the fort and in going on, to be one of the few who entered the fort. When the rest of the body of men to his rear were forced to retreat under a devastating fire, he was forced to withdraw through lack of support and to seek the shelter of one of the mounds near the stockade from which point he succeeded in regaining the safety of his ship.

Sheridan

James

8

5

18641865

Quartermaster

1831

NJ (Newark)

NY

45

Served as quartermaster on board the USS Oneida in the engagement at Mobile Bay 5 August 1864. Acting as captain of the after 11_inch gun, and wounded in several places, Sheridan remained at his gun until the firing had ceased and then took the place of the signal quartermaster who had been injured by a fall. Recommended for his gallantry and intelligence, Sheridan served courageously throughout this battle which resulted in the capture of the rebel ram Tennessee and the damaging of Fort Morgan.

Shipman

William

1

14

1865

Coxswain

1831

NY (New York)

NY

59

On board the USS Ticonderoga in the attack upon Fort Fisher on 15 Jan 1865. As captain of No. 2 gun, stationed near the 100-pounder Parrott rifle when it burst into fragments, killing 8 men and wounding 12 more, Shipman promptly recognized the effect produced by the explosion and, despite the carnage surrounding them, and the enemy's fire, encouraged the men at their guns by exclaiming "Go ahead, boys! This is only the fortunes of war!"

Shivers

John

1

14

1865

Private, USMC

1830

Canada

NJ

59

On board the USS Minnesota, in the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 Jan 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, Pvt. Shivers advanced to the top of the sand hill and partly through the breach in the palisades despite enemy fire which killed or wounded many officers and men. When more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, he remained with the party until dark when it came safely away, bringing its wounded, its arms and its colors.

Shutes

Henry

4

25

1862

Captain of the Forecastle

1804

MD (Baltimore)

MD

71

Served as captain of the forecastle on board the USS Wissahickon during the battle of New Orleans, 24 and 25 April 1862; and in the engagement at Fort McAllister, 27 February 1863. Going on board the USS Wissahickon from the USS Don where his seamanlike qualities as gunner's mate were outstanding, Shutes performed his duties with skill and courage. Showing a presence of mind and prompt action when a shot from Fort McAllister penetrated the Wissahickon below the water line and entered the powder magazine, Shutes contributed materially to the preservation of the powder and safety of the ship.

Simkins

Lebbeus

8

5

1864

Coxswain

1836

NY (Utica)

NY

45

On board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Simkins performed his duties with skill and courage throughout a furious 2_hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Smith *

Charles H.

12

30

1862

Coxswain

1826

ME

ME

59

On board the USS Rhode Island which was engaged in rescuing men from the stricken Monitor, on Dec 30, 1862. After the Monitor sprang a leak and went down, Smith courageously risked his life in a gallant attempt to rescue members of the crew. Although he, too, lost his life during the hazardous operation, he had made every effort possible to save the lives of his fellow men.

Smith

Edwin

10

3

1862

Ordinary Seaman

1841

NY (New York)

NY

--

On board the USS Whitehead in the attack upon Franklin, Va., 3 Oct 1862. When his ship became grounded in a narrow passage as she rounded a bend in the Blackwater River, Smith, realizing the hazards of lowering a boat voluntarily swam to shore with a line under the enemy's heavy fire. His fearless action enabled his ship to maintain steady fire and keep the enemy in check during the battle.

Smith

James

8

5

1864

Captain of the Forecastle

1826

NY (Albany)

NY

45

Served as captain of a gun on board the U.S.S: Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee, in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Smith fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the prolonged battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the successful attacks carried out on Fort Morgan.

Smith

John

8

5

1864

Captain of  the Forecastle

1831

MA (Boston)

MA

45

On board the USS Lackawanna during the successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Serving as a gun captain and finding he could not depress his gun when alongside the rebel ironclad Tennessee, Smith threw a hand holystone into one of the ports at a rebel using abusive language against the crew of the ship. He continued his daring action throughout the engagement which resulted in the capture of the prize ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of Fort Morgan.

Smith

John

8

5

1864

Second Captain of the Top

1826

NY (Albany)

NY

45

As captain of a gun on board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Smith fought his gun with skill and courage throughout a furious 2_hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Smith

Oloff

8

5

1864

Coxswain

1833

Sweden

NY

45

On board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864 Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Smith performed his duties with skill and courage throughout the furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Smith

Thomas

3

6

1865

Seaman

1838

England

NY

59

As seaman on board the USS Magnolia, St. Marks, Fla., 5 and 6 March 1865. Serving with the Army in charge of Navy howitzers during the attack on St. Marks and throughout this fierce engagement, Smith made remarkable efforts in assisting transport of the gun, and his coolness and determination in courageously standing by his gun while under the fire of the enemy were a credit to the service to which he belonged.

Smith

Walter B.

8

5

1864

Ordinary Seaman

1827

NY

NY

45

On board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Cool and courageous at his station throughout the prolonged action, Smith rendered outstanding service at the 100-pounder rifle on the topgallant forecastle and while firing his musket into the gun ports of the rebel Tennessee.

Smith

Willard M.

8

5

1864

Corporal, USMC

1840

NY (Alleghany)

NY

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats, and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire continued to fall, Cpl. Smith fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee.

Smith

William

6

19

1864

Quarter-master

1838

Ireland

NH

45

Served as second quartermaster on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Acting as captain of the 11-inch pivot gun of the second division, Smith carried out his duties courageously and deserved special notice for the deliberate and cool manner in which he acted throughout the bitter engagement. It is stated by rebel officers that this gun was more destructive and did more damage than any other gun of Kearsarge.

Sprowle

David

8

5

1864

Orderly Sergeant, USMC

1811

NY (Lisbon)

NY

45

On board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats, and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Orderly Sgt. Sprowle inspired the men of the marine guard and directed a division of great guns throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Stanley

William A.

8

5

1864

Shell Man

1831

MA

MA

45

Shell man on No. 8 on board the USS Hartford during successful actions against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. Although severely wounded when his ship sustained numerous hits under the enemy's terrific shellfire, Stanley continued to pass shell until forced by the loss of blood to go below.

Sterling

James E.

8

5

1864

Coal Heaver

1838

ME

ME

45

On board the USS Brooklyn during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. Although wounded when heavy enemy return fire raked the decks of his ship, Sterling courageously remained at his post and continued passing shell until struck down a second time and completely disabled.

Stevens

Daniel D.

1

14

1865

Quarter-master

1840

TN (Sagnange)

MA

--

(Letter 15 July 1870, Secretary of the Navy to Hon. S. Hooper.) On board the USS Canonicus during attacks on Fort Fisher, on 13 Jan 1865. As the Canonicus moved into position at 700 yards from shore, the enemy troops soon obtained her range and opened with heavy artillery fire, subjecting her to several hits and near misses until late in the afternoon when the heavier ships coming into line drove them into their bombproofs. Twice during the battle, in which his ship sustained 36 hits, the flag was shot away and gallantly replaced by Stevens.

Stoddard

James

3

5

1864

Seaman

1838

NC

NC

32

: Off Yazoo City, Miss., 5 March 1864. Embarking from the Marmora with a 12-pound howitzer mounted on a field carriage, Stoddard landed with the gun and crew in the midst of heated battle and, bravely standing by his gun despite enemy rifle fire which cut the gun carriage and rammer, contributed to the turning back of the enemy during the fierce engagement.

Stout

Richard

1

30

1863

Landsman

1836

NY

NY

32

Serving on board the USS Isaac Smith, Stono River, 30 Jan 1863. While reconnoitering on the Stono River on this date the USS Isaac Smith became trapped in a rebel ambush. Fired on from two sides, she fought her guns until disabled. Suffering heavy casualties and at the mercy of the enemy who was delivering a raking fire from every side, she struck her colors out of regard for the wounded aboard, and all aboard were taken prisoners. Carrying out his duties bravely through this action, Stout was severely wounded and lost his right arm while returning the rebel fire.

Strahan

Robert

6

19

1864

Captain of the Top

---

NJ

NJ

45

Served as captain of the top on board the USS Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Acting as captain of the No. 1 gun, Strahan carried out his duties in the face of heavy enemy fire and exhibited marked coolness and good conduct throughout the engagement. Strahan was highly recommended by his division officer for his gallantry and meritorious achievements.

Sullivan

James

12

23

1864

Ordinary Seaman

1833

NY (New York)

NY

45

On board the USS Agawam as one of a volunteer crew of a powder boat which was exploded near Fort Fisher, 2 Dec 1864. The powder boat, towed in by the Wilderness to prevent detection by the enemy, cast off and slowly steamed to within 300 yards of the beach. After fuses and fires had been lit and a second anchor with short scope let go to assure the boat's tailing inshore, the crew boarded the Wilderness and proceeded a distance of 12 miles from shore. Less than two hours later the explosion took place, and the following day fires were observed still burning at the forts.

Sullivan

John

6

25

1864

Seaman

1839

NY (New York)

NY

45

Served as seaman on board the USS Monticello during the reconnaissance of the harbor and water defenses of Wilmington, N.C. 23 to 25 June 1864. Taking part in a reconnaissance of enemy defenses which covered a period of 2 days and nights, Sullivan courageously carried out his duties during this action, which resulted in the capture of a mail carrier and mail, the cutting of a telegraph wire, and the capture of a large group of prisoners. Although in immediate danger from the enemy at all times, Sullivan showed gallantry and coolness throughout this action which resulted in the gaining of much vital information of the rebel defenses.

Sullivan

Timothy

--

--

1863

Coxswain

1835

Ireland

NY

11

Served on board the USS Louisville during various actions of that vessel. During the engagements of the Louisville, Sullivan served as first captain of a 9-inch gun and throughout his period of service was "especially commended for his attention to duty, bravery, and coolness in action."

Summers

Robert

1

14

1865

Chief Quarter-master

1838

Prussia

NY

59

Summers served on board the USS Ticonderoga in the attacks on Fort Fisher, 13 to 15 Jan 1865. The ship took position in the line of battle and maintained a well-directed fire upon the batteries to the left of the palisades during the initial phase of the engagement. Although several of the enemy's shots fell over and around the vessel, the Ticonderoga fought her guns gallantly throughout 3 consecutive days of battle until the flag was planted on one of the strongest fortifications possessed by the rebels.

Swanson

John

1

14

1865

Seaman

1842

Sweden

MA

59

On board the USS Santiago de Cuba during the assault on Fort Fisher on 15 Jan 1865. As one of a boat crew detailed to one of the generals on shore, Swanson bravely entered the fort in the assault and accompanied his party in carrying dispatches at the height of the battle. He was 1 of 6 men who entered the fort in the assault from the fleet.

Swatton

Edward

1

14

1865

Seaman

1836

NY (New York)

NY

59

On board the USS Santiago de Cuba during the assault on Fort Fisher on 15 Jan 1865. As one of a boat crew detailed to one of the generals on shore, Swatton bravely entered the fort in the assault and accompanied his party in carrying dispatches at the height of the battle. He was 1 of 6 men who entered the fort in the assault from the fleet.

Swearer

Benjamin

8

29

1861

Seaman

1825

MD (Baltimore)

MD

11

Embarked in a surfboat from the USS Pawnee during action against Fort Clark, off Baltimore Inlet, 29 August 1861. Taking part in a mission to land troops and to remain inshore and provide protection, Swearer rendered gallant service throughout the action and had the honor of being the first man to raise the flag on the captured fort.

Talbott

William

1

11

1863

Captain of the Forecastle

1812

ME

MA

32

Served as captain of the forecastle on board the USS Louisville at the capture of Arkansas Post, 10 and 11 Jan 1863. Carrying out his duties as captain of a 9_inch gun, Talbott was conspicuous for ability and bravery throughout this engagement with the enemy.

Tallentlne *

James

1

14

1865

Quarter Gunner

1840

England

MD

45

Served as quarter gunner on board the USS Tacony during the taking of Plymouth, N.C., 31 Oct 1864. Carrying out his duties faithfully during the capture of Plymouth, Tallentine distinguished himself by a display of coolness when he participated in landing and spiking a 9_inch gun while under devastating fire from enemy musketry. Tallentine later gave his life while courageously engaged in storming Fort Fisher, 15 Jan 1865.

Taylor

George

8

5

1864

Armorer

1830

NY (Watertown)

NY

45

On board the USS Lackawanna during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, on 5 August 1864. When an enemy shell exploded in the shell room, Taylor although wounded went into the room and, with his hand, extinguished the fire from the explosion. He then carried out his duties during the remainder of the prolonged action which resulted in the capture of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of Fort Morgan.

Taylor

John

9

9

1864

Seaman

---

--

--

71

Seaman in charge of the picket boat attached to the Navy Yard, New York, 9 September 1865. Acting with promptness, coolness and good judgment, Taylor rescued from drowning Commander S. D. Trenchard, of the U.S. Navy, who fell overboard in attempting to get on a ferryboat, which had collided with an English steamer, and needed immediate assistance.

Taylor

Thomas

8

5

1864

Coxswain

1834

ME (Bangor)

ME

59

Served on board the USS Metacomet during the action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the rebel ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Taylor encouraged the men of the forward pivot gun when the officer in command displayed cowardice, doing honor to the occasion.

Taylor

William G.

1

14

1865

Captain of the Forecastle

1831

PA (Philadelphia)

PA

59

On board the USS Ticonderoga during attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 Dec 1864. As captain of a gun, Taylor performed his duties with coolness and skill as his ship took position in the line of battle and delivered its fire on the batteries on shore. Despite the depressing effect caused when an explosion of the 100-pounder Parrott rifle killed 8 men and wounded 12 more, and the enemy's heavy return fire, he calmly remained at his station during the 2 days' operations.

Thielberg

Henry

4

14

1863

Seaman

1833

Germany

MA

17

Serving temporarily on board the USS Mount Washington during the Nansemond River action, 14 April 1863. After assisting in hauling up and raising the flagstaff, Thielberg volunteered to go up on the pilothouse and observe the movements of the enemy and although 3 shells struck within a few inches of his head, remained at his post until ordered to descend.

Thompson

Henry A.

1

14

1865

Private, USMC

1841

England

PA

59

On board the USS Minnesota in the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 Jan 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, Private Thompson advanced partly through a breach in the palisades and nearer to the fort than any man from his ship despite enemy fire which killed or wounded many officers and men. When more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, he remained with the party until dark, when it came safely away, bringing its wounded, its arms and its colors.

Thompson

William

11

7

1861

Signal Quartermaster

---

NJ
(Cape May County)

--

17

(Entered service at Boston, Mass.) During action of the main squadron of ships against heavily defended Forts Beauregard and Walker on Hilton Head, 7 November 1861. Serving as signal quartermaster on board the USS Mohican, Thompson steadfastly steered the ship with a steady and bold heart under the batteries; was wounded by a piece of shell but remained at his station until he fell from loss of blood. Legs since amputated.

Todd

Samuel

8

5

1864

Quartermaster

1815

NH (Portsmouth)

NH

45

Stationed at the conn on board the USS Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks from stem to stern, Todd performed his duties with outstanding skill and courage throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the prize rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Tomlin

Andrew J.

1

14

1865

Corporal, USMC

1844

NJ (Goshen)

NJ

59

As corporal of the guard on board the USS Wabash during the assault on Fort Fisher, on 15 Jan 1865. As 1 of 200 marines assembled to hold a line of entrenchments in the rear of the fort which the enemy threatened to attack in force following a retreat in panic by more than two-thirds of the assaulting ground forces, Cpl. Tomlin took position in line and remained until morning when relief troops arrived from the fort. When one of his comrades was struck down by enemy fire, he unhesitatingly advanced under a withering fire of musketry into an open plain close to the fort and assisted the wounded man to a place of safety.

Tripp

Othniel

1

14

1865

Chief Boatswain's Mate

1826

ME

ME

59

On board the USS Seneca in the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 Jan 1865. Despite severe enemy fire which halted an attempt by his assaulting party to enter the stockade, Tripp boldly charged through the gap in the stockade although the center of the line, being totally unprotected, fell back along the open beach and left too few in the ranks to attempt an offensive operation.

Truett

Alexander H.

8

5

1864

Coxswain

1834

MD (Baltimore)

MD

45

On board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Truett performed his duties with skill and courage throughout a furious 2_hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

Vantine

Joseph E.

3

14

1863

First Class Fireman

1835

PA (Philadelphia)

PA

17

Serving on board the USS Richmond in the attack on Port Hudson, 14 March 1863. Damaged by a 6-inch solid rifle shot which shattered the starboard safety-valve chamber and also damaged the port safety valve, the fireroom of the Richmond immediately filled with steam to place it in an extremely critical condition. Acting courageously in this crisis, Vantine persisted in penetrating the steam-filled room in order to haul the hot fires of the furnaces and continued this action until the gravity of the situation had been lessened.

Vaughn

Pinkerton R.

3

14

1863

Sergeant, USMC

1839

PA (Downingtown)

PA

17

Serving on board the USS Mississippi during her abandonment and firing in the action with the Port Hudson batteries, 14 March 1863. During the abandonment of the Mississippi which had to be grounded, Sgt. Vaughn rendered invaluable assistance to his commanding officer, remaining with the ship until all the crew had landed and the ship had been fired to prevent its falling into enemy hands. Persistent until the last, and conspicuously cool under the heavy shellfire, Sgt. Vaughn was finally ordered to save himself as he saw fit.

Verney

James W.

1

14

1865

Chief Quarter-master

1834

ME

ME

59

Served as chief quartermaster on board the USS Pontoosuc during the capture of Fort Fisher and Wilmington, 24 Dec 1864 to 22 February 1865. Carrying out his duties faithfully throughout this period, Verney was recommended for gallantry and skill and for his cool courage while under fire of the enemy throughout these various actions.

Wagg

Maurice

12

31

1862

Coxswain

1837

England

NY

45

Served on board the USS Rhode Island, which was engaged in saving the lives of the officers and crew of the Monitor off Hatteras, 31 Dec 1862. Participating in the hazardous task of rescuing the officers and crew of the sinking Monitor, Wagg distinguished himself by meritorious conduct during this operation.

Ward

James

8

5

1864

Quarter Gunner

1833

NY (New York)

NY

45

Serving as gunner on board the USS Lackawanna during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Although wounded and ordered below, Ward refused to go, but rendered aid at one of the guns when the crew was disabled. He subsequently remained in the chains, heaving the lead, until nearly caught in the collision with the ram Tennessee. He continued to serve bravely throughout the action which resulted in the capture of the prize ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of Fort Morgan.

Warren

David

6

25

1864

Coxswain

1836

Scotland

NY

45

Served as coxswain on board the USS Monticello during the reconnaissance of the harbor and water defenses of Wilmington, N.C., 23 to 25 June 1864. Taking part in a reconnaissance of enemy defenses which lasted 2 days and nights, Warren courageously carried out his duties during this action which resulted in the capture of a mail carrier and mail, the cutting of a telegraph wire, and the capture of a large group of prisoners. Although in immediate danger from the enemy, Warren showed gallantry and coolness throughout this action which resulted in the gaining of much vital information of the rebel defenses.

Webster

Henry S.

1

14

1865

Landsman

1845

NY (Stockholm)

NY

49

On board the USS Susquehanna during the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 Jan 1865. When enemy fire halted the attempt by his landing party to enter the fort and more than two-thirds of the men fell back along the open beach, Webster voluntarily remained with one of his wounded officers, under fire, until aid could be obtained to bring him to the rear.

Weeks

Charles H.

9

21

1864

Captain of the Foretop

1837

NJ

NJ

84

Served as captain of the foretop on board the USS Montauk, 21 September 1864. During the night of 21 September, when fire was discovered in the magazine lightroom of that vessel, causing a panic and demoralizing the crew, Weeks, notwithstanding the cry of "fire in the magazine," displayed great presence of mind and rendered valuable service in extinguishing the flames which were imperiling the ship and the men on board.

Wells

William

8

5

1864

Quarter-master

1832

Germany

NY

45

As landsman and lookout on board the USS Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship [and] the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Wells performed his duties with skill and courage throughout a furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

White

Joseph

1

14

1865

Captain of the Gun

1840

DC (Washington)

PA

59

White served on board the USS New Ironsides during action in several attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 Dec 1864; and 13,14, and 15 Jan 1865. The ship steamed in and took the lead in the ironclad division close inshore and immediately opened its starboard battery in a barrage of well-directed fire to cause several fires and explosions and dismount several guns during the first 2 days of fighting. Taken under fire as she steamed into position on 13 Jan, the New Ironsides fought all day and took on ammunition at night despite severe weather conditions. When the enemy came out of his bombproofs to defend the fort against the storming party, the ships battery disabled nearly every gun on the fort facing the shore before the ceasefire order was given by the flagship.

Whitfield

Daniel

8

5

1864

Quarter-master

1821

NJ (Newark)

NJ

45

Serving as quartermaster on board the USS Lackawanna during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the rebel ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Acting as captain of a gun, Whitfield coolly stood by his gun, holding on to the lock string and waited alongside the rebel ram Tennessee until able to fire the shot that entered her port. Whitfield courageously carried out his duties during the prolonged action which resulted in the capture of the prize ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of Fort Morgan.

Wilcox

Franklin L.

1

14

1865

Ordinary Seaman

1831

NY (Paris)

NY

59

On board the USS Minnesota in action during the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 Jan 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, Wilcox advanced to the top of the sand hill and partly through the breach in the palisades despite enemy fire which killed and wounded many officers and men. When more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, he remained with the party until dark when it came safely away, bringing its wounded, its arms and its colors.

Wilkes

Henry

10

27

1864

Landsman

1845

NY (New York)

NY

45

Wilkes served on board U.S. Picket Boat No. 1 in action, 27 Oct 1864, against the Confederate Ram, Albemarle, which had resisted repeated attacks by our steamers and had kept a large force of vessels employed in watching her. The picket boat, equipped with a spar torpedo, succeeded in passing the enemy pickets within 20 yards without being discovered and then made for the Albemarle under a full head of steam. Immediately taken under fire by the ram, the small boat plunged on, jumped the log boom which encircled the target and exploded its torpedo under the port bow of the ram. The picket boat was destroyed by enemy fire and almost the entire crew taken prisoner or lost.

Wilkes

Perry

5

5

1864

Pilot

1830

IN

--

45

(Entered service at Indiana.) Served as pilot on board the USS Signal, Red River, 5 May 1864. Proceeding up the Red River, the USS Signal engaged a large force of enemy field batteries and sharpshooters, returning their fire until the ship was totally disabled, at which time the white flag was ordered raised. Acting as pilot throughout the battle, Wilkes stood by his wheel until it was disabled in his hands by a bursting enemy shell.

Williams

Anthony

1

14

1865

Sailmaker's Mate

1822

MA (Plymouth)

ME

59

Served as sailmaker's mate on board the USS Pontoosuc during the capture of Fort Fisher and Wilmington, 24 Dec 1864 to 22 February 1865. Carrying out his duties faithfully throughout this period, Williams was recommended for gallantry and skill and for his cool courage while under the fire of the enemy throughout these various actions.

Williams

Augustus

1

14

1865

Seaman